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Attending the NPS ceremony recognizing AFCEA academic award winners are Adm. Mike Mullen, USN (Ret.) (front row, left), former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Gen. Keith Alexander, USA (Ret.) (front row, right), former director of the National Security Agency.

Former Joint Chiefs Chairman, NSA Director Recognize Students, Promote Postgraduate Education

September 1, 2015
By Lawrence Reeves and Javier Chagoya

In June, Gen. Keith Alexander, USA (Ret.), former director of the National Security Agency, walked into the NPS, his alma mater, joining fellow alumnus Adm. Mike Mullen, USN (Ret.), former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The AFCEA Monterey Chapter invited the leaders to recognize the academic achievements of two international students and to promote the benefits of postgraduate science and engineering education.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems Need Information Interoperability

September 1, 2015
By Steven Litwiller and Brian S. Talicuran



Despite substantial increases in capability and applications, U.S. and multinational robotics and autonomous systems have limited information interoperability, convoluting an already complex data-sharing environment. The U.S. Defense Department finds itself in a predicament created by rapid and independent fielding of systems over the past 10 to 15 years along with the use of proprietary software and payload and bandwidth restrictions.

The Unmanned Samaritans

September 1, 2015
By Daniel DuBravec



When a disease outbreak occurs, medical response teams often need to send blood samples to labs for analysis—labs that might be a great distance from the outbreak location. Delivery drones could alter such dire circumstances, offering solutions to transport small packages.

The Science and Technology Directorate and Homeland Security Investigations, both within the Homeland Security Department, are working together to evaluate state-of-the-art biometric technologies and ultimately to integrate those technologies into existing investigation tools. Because child exploitation images and videos pose the greatest challenge, technologies that aid in those investigations likely will benefit a broader range of missions.
Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents assigned to the Cyber Crimes Center arrested a computer and information technology specialist on child pornography charges. HSI and the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate have initiated a major program to evaluate state-of-the-art biometrics solutions.

Biometrics Program Combats Child Abuse

September 1, 2015
By George I. Seffers
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The Department of Homeland Security’s Non-Cooperative Biometrics Program will evaluate cutting-edge technologies, such as facial recognition and tattoo identification, and integrate them into current investigation tools.

A U.S. airman photographs the iris of an Afghan district police chief. The images are cataloged in a database containing biometric information used to identify locals.
An Afghan policeman is fingerprinted to be part of a biometrics database used to identify local public safety personnel.
A U.S. sailor uses interagency identity detection equipment, part of the automated toolset to collect and store biometric data such as fingerprints and eye and facial scans.

Are Biometrics the New Intelligence Discipline?

September 1, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
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The use of biometrics for force protection alone could be a bygone approach as the blossoming technology makes inroads toward the development of a new intelligence discipline. Biometrics intelligence ultimately could be the next INT in the menu of intelligence specialties.

When Computers Know You By Your Keystrokes

September 1, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
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The latest methods of identity verification might border on intrusive as behavioral biometrics continues to evolve. Tactics range from what some might consider simple measurements of keystroke dynamics to cutting-edge future solutions that could constantly monitor a user’s breathing or eye movements.

The growth in cellular connectivity is impelling service providers to seek more bandwidth to allow users to download whatever files—including streaming video—they wish onto their handheld devices. However, this push for more bandwidth may run afoul of efforts to build the Internet of Things, which also will require portions of the spectrum to link diverse hardware.

Spectrum Competition Increases in Frequency

September 1, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Technology developers and commercial service providers are racing to exploit elements of the radio frequency spectrum with advances that could be at odds with each other. Increased consumer demand for wireless services is driving providers to develop new capabilities for their systems.

Verifying Tolkachev

September 1, 2015
By Dr. R. Norris Keeler



While calling Tolkachev the billion-dollar spy certainly is reasonable, his success depended on the U.S. officer and the Air Force management team that supported him. Perhaps it would be appropriate to call the unnamed officer the billion-dollar procurement man.

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