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Maj. Gen. Thomas Franz, GEAF, former commander of the NATO Communications and Information Systems Group (NCISG) (c), walks with other participants during Steadfast Cobalt 15. About 39 organizations from 25 nations contributed to the exercise.
A French officer reviews notes in front of communications antennas during NATO’s Steadfast Cobalt 15 exercise, held from late May to early June in Poland. The exercise evaluated communications and information system requirements for the NATO Response Force, which will be stood up next year.
As part of a technology insertion element in Steadfast Cobalt 15, the Dragonfly communications system was employed for the first time in a large exercise. It proved its worth, but the exercise pointed out areas of improvement that may be necessary to keep up with technological and capability advances.

NATO Tests Response Force Communications

August 1, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
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A recent NATO exercise in Eastern Europe established criteria for NATO Response Force communications, including new technologies and cybersecurity, that will be essential if the rapid-reaction unit is called on in the event of a crisis imposed on an alliance member.

Digital sensors in the U.S. Army’s new night vision goggles let warfighters view images on helmet displays and fuse digital images with symbols.
CERDEC’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate is developing the next generation of thermal weapon sights, which will enhance soldier situational awareness, lethality and precision while decreasing collateral damage.

Soldiers Look for Supersight

August 1, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
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U.S. soldiers might not have super-X-ray and heat vision to see across the full electromagnetic spectrum—yet—but recent technological strides are enhancing sight on the battlefield by leaps and bounds.

A U.S. Army AH-64 Apache fires point detonation rounds during a training exercise in South Korea. The Army intends to equip its helicopter fleet with the Small Airborne Networking Radio.
Capt. Jonathan Page, USA, uses the Rifleman Radio and Nett Warrior end-user device of the Army’s Network Capability Set 13 at Nangalam Base, Afghanistan. The Army awarded contracts to Harris Corporation and Thales Defense and Security Incorporated in April for the Rifleman Radio.

A Big Year for Tactical Communications

August 1, 2015
By George I. Seffers
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The U.S. Army’s tactical radio programs will meet a series of major milestones in the coming months, moving systems toward deployment into the hands of warfighters. Once fielded, the systems and their associated software will extend transmission range, provide on-demand satellite communications at the lowest levels and allow an alternative when satellite signals are degraded or denied.

Soldiers at the U.S. Army Cyber Operation Center at Fort Gordon monitor networks for possible attacks by adversaries. The Army is striving to bring signal, cyber and military intelligence together in a partnership to meet challenges in the changing information environment.
U.S. Army Strykers receive advanced technologies to enable them to link with the Army’s new tactical communications network, which will allow soldiers to extend their connectivity to greater distances. Among the Army’s information modernization plan is an effort to bring the data capabilities of home stations directly to deployed soldiers in the field.

Army Modernizes With an Eye Toward Defensewide Efforts

August 1, 2015
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The U.S. Army is working to team with industry and the other services to update its information technologies amid a greater emphasis on cyber. A multiyear plan establishing short- and long-term goals serves as the campaign map, but obstacles remain if the Army is to achieve its aims.

Defense Department CIO Terry Halvorsen addresses mobility concerns at the enterprise level. Photo by Michael Carpenter
Defense Department CIO Terry Halvorsen says the department needs industry mobility solutions while addressing a sell-out crowd during the AFCEA D.C. Chapter's mobility industry day in Washington, D.C. Photo by Michael Carptenter

Defense Department Embraces 'Good Enough' for Mobile Security

July 10, 2015
By Sandra Jontz
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As the Defense Department dives into the mobility ecosystem and embraces the use of mobile devices by the warfighter in the battlefield up to the highest echelons of leadership, it seeks solutions too for full-on mobility at the enterprise level. Devices are secure enough, leaders say. Now, they want solutions from industry on how to protect the data. 

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