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Modeling Reliability In Distributed Computer Networks

November 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

U.S. government computer scientists are studying how computer grids react to volatile conditions to understand how events such as virus attacks, sudden changes in workload and cyberattacks can affect linked groups of hundreds or thousands of geographically dispersed machines.

Farewell

September 2001
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

After serving as AFCEA International's president for the past five and a half years, I have decided to retire. While a decision such as this is never made without reflection and deliberation, this decision was particularly difficult because AFCEA is more than an organization-it is a network of talented, dedicated and committed individuals.

NATO Wrestles With Technology

September 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

The march of technology is improving interoperability and increasing capabilities among NATO and Partnership for Peace nations. New systems and bridging components are allowing forces to share information to a greater degree and under more circumstances than ever. However, the same new technologies are spawning a new generation of capabilities that are complicating efforts for true alliance interoperability.

Alliance Forces Move Toward Unified Data Infrastructure

September 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

The adoption of network-based operations combined with commercial information technology and telecommunications products is enhancing the interoperability of North Atlantic Treaty Organization and Partnership for Peace nations' military forces. These developments also are allowing many smaller and former Eastern Bloc countries to rapidly evolve their militaries into modern information-based organizations.

Transient Partnerships Stretch Security Policy Management

September 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

The U.S. Defense Department is coordinating a multidimensional effort to seek out technologies that would bring order to the oftentimes chaotic environment of a coalition operation. Among the top priorities is identifying information security approaches that ensure continued communications when the composition of the coalition changes or the ad hoc area network is attacked.

Wireless Tail Wags Infrastructure Dog

September 2001
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Assuring the integrity of information in radio frequency tactical networks is rapidly becoming a linchpin for the success of the U.S. Defense Department's Global Information Grid. Without cyberdefense advances, wireless domain devices cannot function properly in the face of information warfare, raising vulnerability issues for the entire U.S. communications infrastructure.

Plug in, Turn on, Surf Away

September 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Internet access may soon be as close as the nearest electrical outlet. New power-line networking technology allows voice, data and video signals to travel through standard electrical lines, turning building or campus electrical grids into ready-made communications pathways. Connected by devices similar to modems that are plugged into wall sockets, computers and smart appliances can be linked together or to existing fiber optic lines without extensive installation costs.

Sensor Web Supports Tactical Teamwork

September 2001
By P. Michael Hoffman and Veronica Deschambault

Networking technology currently under development will allow users to monitor and operate sensors from a single, central, distant location. In tactical scenarios, this capability will reduce the need to send soldiers into the field to check or activate sensors. The system features an optional radio communication module that enables it to operate much like a wide area network, and ease of installation and portability make it a candidate for use in military training exercises.

Littoral Battlespace Becomes Smaller

September 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

The extended littoral battlespace is beginning to shrink as commanders acquire the capability to monitor force operations from greater distances in near-real and real time. Recent exercises held on and off the California coast demonstrated a number of different approaches to linking offshore commanders with onshore events.

Privacy in the Public Domain

September 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

When the framers of the U.S. Constitution outlined citizens' rights, they could not have foreseen the birth of communications capabilities that would pervade both personal and professional life. Although the fourth amendment is very clear in its prohibition of unreasonable search and seizure, technology has blurred the line between what is considered public and private space. Privacy policy watchdog groups believe that the biggest challenge may be that technology seems to develop at the speed of light, while the legal protection of personal privacy moves at the speed of legislators.

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