signalarticles

Simulator Sharpens Raptor's Claws

October 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

A powerful computer that generates thousands of radar signals is being used to test the electronic warfare suite on the F-22 Raptor. The device pushes the aircraft's countermeasure package to the breaking point, allowing engineers to locate, analyze and repair faults in the system prior to installation.

Operational Readiness Takes Flight

October 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

Over the past decade, downsizing in the U.S. Air Force has refocused the service's goals on the efficiency, readiness and maximization of manpower and resources within a tighter budget. Restructuring the organization's planning and allocation systems under a new program will ensure that the challenges of a rapidly changing global defense picture will continue to be met.

Joint Forces Play the Ultimate War Game

October 2000
By Maryann Lawlor
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Space may be the final frontier for travel, but for today's earthbound warriors it is the enabler of systems that strengthen and speed operations. Recognizing that the military's reliance on space-based assets will continue to grow, the U.S. Defense Department is seeking new ways for these resources to give its soldiers the advantage. No longer viewed as a luxury, the cosmos is now treasured as an intricate component of a successful mission.

Warriors Road Test Technology

October 2000
By Edward J. Walsh

The U.S. Defense Department, with the cooperation of nations worldwide, is examining a multitude of technologies that would enhance today's command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. Recently created systems would allow military forces to acquire targets more accurately, collaborate remotely and share weather information to determine how conditions will affect a planned mission or the effectiveness of a weapon. Emerging technologies also would passively monitor potential targets, facilitate near-real-time access to up-to-date terrain information, provide a defense against information operations, and reduce the footprint and life-cycle cost of equipment.

Victory Has a New Definition

November 2000
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

Information is the Swiss Army Knife of the tactical warfighter. It is a multifaceted tool that can be applied to a wide range of functions, many of which have unintended benefits. It is rapidly migrating from a warfighter's helper to a more central role in military operations. In this era of network-centric warfare, information is a weapon, and its enabling hardware are becoming weapon systems.

Units Connect Any Time, Anyplace

November 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

U.S. Army rapid deployment forces will field an advanced communications management system that will provide its units with a more efficient data conduit than is available with legacy equipment. The vehicle-mounted platform consists of mobile switches and routers that feature integrated commercial and government hardware and software designed to provide voice, video and data service in a tactical environment.

Robotic Vehicles Scout Out Future

November 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

By the latter part of this decade, a fleet of wheeled robots now evolving toward autonomy may perform many of the tasks handled by today's front-line soldier. The U.S. Army is experimenting with a prototype of radio-operated vehicles capable of engaging in various kinds of reconnaissance and surveillance activities. Once fully integrated into the service, these unmanned units will enable the execution of important objectives while reducing the casualties and logistical complexities often associated with rapid reaction forces.

Roadblocks to Interoperability Frustrate Coalition Communicators

November 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Nations seeking to enable information exchange among international coalition partners face several daunting tasks for laying the groundwork for vital interoperability. Many of these efforts involve individual national commitments to build interoperability into their systems and practices, while others require consultation and consensus before proceeding along equipment deployment paths.

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