signalarticles

Technology Links East-West Forces

November 2000
By Maryann Lawlor
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U.S. military forces on the Korean peninsula are mobilizing the power of technology to nurture a partnership that has been more than 50 years in the making. The unique nature of the Korean theater of operations has prompted the combined and joint commands in that area to fine-tune information systems to meet their distinct requirements.

Australia Delves Into Digital

November 2000
By Alec Umansky

The Australian army is taking advantage of technology that consumers recognize as a faster way to connect to the Internet. To enhance their communications capabilities in the field, the service is collaborating with industry to design equipment that meets its specialized needs. The system has broad applications across a spectrum of other fields, including transportation and energy resources.

Sweden's Science Sizzles, Draws Bids

November 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Forced to go its own way in technology and weapon system development because of a peacetime nonalignment policy and wartime neutrality, Sweden suddenly finds itself the focus of international business attention. Extensive changes are taking place in Sweden's defense and aerospace industries as foreign interest centers on investment, acquisition, merger and multinational consortium arrangements.

Communications Move Into Fast Lane

November 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

As businesses increasingly turn to visual methods of interaction, the demand for software programs that support multiple connectivity requirements has fueled growing technological research. The ability to tap the virtually limitless resources of voice, video and data services for use in real-time collaborative communications between companies has attracted interest in the ways these companies can maximize their Internet capabilities.

Microfly Generates Research Buzz

November 2000
By Sharon Berry

A research pipeline between biologists and engineers has led to a new class of microrobotics, spawning a paperclip-sized mechanical flying insect that will weigh one-tenth of a gram and will measure 1 inch from wing tip to wing tip. The result will be applied in search and rescue missions, mine detection and even planetary exploration.

Thursday, February 3, 2005

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The third and final day of West 2005, the annual conference and exposition sponsored by AFCEA International and the U.S. Naval Institute, featured speakers and panels covering topics ranging from homeland security to support for military personnel.

Wednesday, February 2, 2005

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The second and busiest day of West 2005, the annual conference and exposition sponsored by AFCEA International and the U.S. Naval Institute, featured a full day of speeches and panels. While the discussions may not have been as contentious as on the first day, many of the topics aired by speakers and panelists touched on common themes.

Tuesday, February 1, 2005

February 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman
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West 2005, the annual conference and exposition sponsored by AFCEA International and the U.S. Naval Institute, opened with a series of controversial speeches and panel discussions. The three days of conferences, speakers, panels and courses began with the Marine Band playing music ranging from marches to swing jazz. This proved to be something of a metaphor for the ideas that were exchanged on this first day. Being held February 1-3 in San Diego, this year's event mixed current events with prognostications in its program, "Beyond Iraq; How Do We Get Transformation Right?"

Steve Cooper, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

February 2005
By Steve Cooper, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security became the 15th cabinet department in January 2003, consolidating 22 agencies and more than 180,000 people under one unified organization. Prior to creation of the department, no single federal department had homeland security as its primary objective. One can only imagine the challenges it faces as a brand new department in this age of technology. The department's staff is confronted every day with building the enterprise architecture, developing its geospatial capabilities, enhancing its cybersecurity and improving its wireless technologies.

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