signalarticles

Wearable Translator Makes Phrase Books Obsolete

June 2001
By Sharon Berry

A Star Trek-like communications instrument promises to help penetrate the language barrier by providing automated near-real-time translations. The mobile, lightweight device, which is the size of a cellular telephone and can be clipped to a belt, will translate English paired with Spanish, Korean, Chinese, Arabic, Albanian and Thai as well as other major European languages.

Cyberguardian Keeps Hackers, Insider Threats at Bay

June 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Smart hardware will allow administrators to foil intruders and internal attackers before they can cripple computer systems. The firewall, embedded within a network interface card, creates a tamper-resistant security layer that cannot be subverted or deactivated like traditional software-based defenses. When installed on desktop computers and servers throughout an organization, the cards selectively permit or deny certain types of activities at the department, office or individual levels.

AFCEA's Heroes Do Not Toil in Obscurity

July 2001
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

This marks the fourth year in which I have honored the distinguished efforts put forth by unsung heroes of AFCEA International. This group, known as the President's All-Star Team, draws its inspiration from well-known sports designations. It serves as an appropriate metaphor to reflect the teamwork, dedication and hard work of this diverse group of AFCEANs who often toil out of the spotlight.

Spray-on Antennas Make Their Mark

July 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Researchers are studying applications and materials for creating radio antennas that are sprayed onto a surface. Made from commercially available materials, these devices consist of a conductive substance sprayed over a template with a radio aerial pattern on it. The antennas can be applied directly to walls, windows or fabric shelters, allowing military commanders and relief workers to set up communications networks quickly.

Prognosis for Self-Healing Materials Is a Longer Life, Less Maintenance

July 2001
By Sharon Berry

By mimicking the natural response of living tissue to injury, cross-departmental researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a polymeric material that heals itself when damaged. Cracks can be precursors to structural failure, and the ability to treat weakened regions will result in longer-lasting materials used in a variety of applications from microelectronics to aerospace.

British Defense Researchers Privatize With Public Aims

July 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman
E-mail About the Author

This month marks the beginning of the future of defense science in the United Kingdom as the Ministry of Defence breaks with long-standing custom and transfers the bulk of its research to the commercial sector. The newly formed corporate vehicle for this transformation will be required to sink or swim in the marketplace to maintain its viability as a font of technology innovation.

Remodeling Simulation

July 2001
By Maryann Lawlor
E-mail About the Author

The U.S. Defense Department's prime modeling and simulation office is crafting a new master plan that focuses on warfighter needs rather than technological leaps. The plan is emerging from a reassessment of past accomplishments as well as requirements identified by the major commands.

Virtual Training Forges Combat Skills

July 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

The U.S. Army is developing cutting-edge simulation technologies that will allow soldiers to train in a variety of simulated environments. In partnership with the entertainment industry, the service is designing highly realistic and interactive instructional systems that blur the line between contemporary computer-based instruction and science fiction.

Topside Training Submerges Students In Virtual Reality

July 2001
By Maryann Lawlor
E-mail About the Author

Submariners are being immersed in the latest in simulation technology to familiarize them with their future stations and duties. Hardware and software under development during the past few years have come to fruition, and instructors at the U.S. Naval Submarine School, Groton, Connecticut, are excited about the positive impact the new systems have in their classrooms. Students are so excited about training in this fashion that they actually refuse to leave when the final bell rings.

Navy Dives Deeper Into Mine Countermeasures

July 2001
By Maryann Lawlor
E-mail About the Author

Autonomous underwater vehicles, unmanned aircraft and miniature tracked vehicles all rigged with enhanced mine-detecting capabilities will assess a dangerous area before troops disembark from ships, providing them with information about what lies beneath. Outfitting battle groups with these relatively small yet powerful technologies will allow them to conduct mine countermeasures independently so that amphibious units can proceed quickly with their missions.

Pages