SIGNALScape

The Allied Effect in Tight Budget Times

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Defense is being underfunded by between 20 and 40 precent across Europe. This is an incredible reduction in defense spending, and frankly quite dangerous, said VAdm. Robert G. Cooling, Chief of Staff Allied Command Transportation at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. In this environment, we all need allies, even the United States. Fighting along with NATO is better than fighting ad hoc. Future operations need to be politically supportable, which means having the populace behind you, he explained. He notes that trust among nations is a two-way street, and the all of government approach is a force multiplier. In all situations, interoperability is critical, he maintains. He gave credit to the United States as the force behind improving interoperability. It was critical to have it in Afghanistan, and it is showing to be successful in operations in Libya, he related. Addressing the topic of the Joint Forces Command disestablishment as part of the United States' cost-cutting measures, the admiral stressed that this disestablishment does not signal an end to transformation in Europe or in the United States. The foundation is solid, and the forces are the same. But where links become severed, ACT will create new links, he said. The admiral suggested that in the tight fiscal environment the industry is facing that the Framework For Collaborative Interaction might be an organization that could play an important role. The purpose of this group is to enable collaborative work to be carried out in a nonprocurement manner between ACT, industry and academia and to leverage the expertise that each party brings to Alliance capability development efforts. Despite budget considerations, NATO still has a lot of efforts underway.

Ensuring Communications for the Cyber Warrior

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The word cyber is frequently discussed, but depending on perspective, the definition varies. On a panel led by LtGen. Jeffrey A. Sorenson, USA (Ret.), former Chief Information Officer/G-6, Department of the Army, experts from different perspectives came together to discuss cyber in support of the warfighter.

Biggest National Security Threat Is U.S. Fiscal Crisis

May 11, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman
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The fiscal crisis in the United States is its primary security threat today, explained Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, USA, commander, Joint Forces Command at the AFCEA and USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach. The previous decade was one of military expansion, but the next one will be a decade of contraction, he warned. But the most important thing is that "we do not get caught in the trap of doing more with less. There are still redundancies, and we have to figure out how much we need to eliminate them," he explained, but he says this needs to be done carefully within a process. To reach the sizable cuts, there has to be a strategy about what we are willing to stop doing, and that has to be followed by a national security discussion, he said. "From a policy perspective, we have to decide what cuts are going to result in savings and reductions and then see if we can accept the risks." The way forward is through a more integrated joint force that eliminates redundancy. The military and civil government must mitigate reduced capacity by working together, and military leaders must have a view that encompasses all the services. The general also stressed that it is important to leverage the success of recent joint and coalition warfare and more importantly to learn from shortcomings as well as from successes to go forward in changing times. The United States' international partners are also facing fiscal challenges, and so it must remain engaged with the global world. The general called for the United States to continue to reach out and enable and train its coailition partners, both now and in the future. The world today, he related, is increasingly changing and complex with people connected immediately in many places, but many still live in isolation. "The globalization by communications and technology has allowed the disenfranchised to see what they are missing and challenge the status quo at the speed of Twitter," he emphasized.

Advanced Extremely High Frequency Contract Modified

May 11, 2011
By George Seffers

 

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, California, is being awarded an approximate $21 million contract modification to develop software changes in three areas to the Advanced Extremely High Frequency program. The U.S. Air Force Space and Missiles Center, El Segundo, California, is the contracting activity.

Iraqi Air Force Procures Long Range Radar Site

May 11, 2011
By George Seffers

Lockheed Martin Corporation, Eagan, Minnesota, is being awarded an approximate $26 million contract to provide a turn-key Long Range Radar 2 site for the Iraqi Air Force. The Electronic Systems Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity.

ITT Radar Contract Modified

May 11, 2011
By George Seffers

ITT Corporation Electronic Systems Radar Systems - Gilfillan, Van Nuys, California, is being awarded a more than $19 million contract modification for AN/SPS-48G(V) radar modification kits to support the Recovery Obsolescence Availability Radar (ROAR). AN/SPS-48's are radars that are installed on Navy ships for volume air search and surveillance. The modification kits are expected to increase operational availability and decrease operating and support costs. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

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