SIGNALScape

ATAC to Support Aircraft Electronic Warfare Training

November 1, 2010
By George Seffers

Airborne Tactical Advantage Company, Limited Liability Company, Newport News, Virginia, is being awarded a $45 million contract modification for services in support of the commercial air services program, which provides contractor-owned and operated Type III high subsonic and Type IV supersonic aircraft to Navy fleet customers for a wide variety of airborne threat simulation capabilities. This provides for training shipboard and aircraft squadron weapon systems operators and aircrew how to counter potential enemy electronic warfare and electronic attack operations in today's electronic combat environment. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Wozniak: Run California Like Apple

November 1, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak suggested the state of California could benefit by operating like Apple and other high-technology companies. Citing the need for accountability and avoiding crippling debt, Wozniak said, "I wish California were run like Apple" and other similar companies. The state should adopt an approach of, "Here's the goal, here's the money, where's the return on investment?" he told the MILCOM 2010 plenary address audience.

Apple Co-Founder Credits Childhood Glimpse of the Future for Computer Insight

November 1, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Computer, says that his father's work as an electrical engineer for Lockheed helped guide him into computing. Speaking at the plenary session opening MILCOM 2010 in San Jose, California, Wozniak related how his father would take him to technology shows to spur his interest in the field. Wozniak described how, in the late 1950s, one exhibitor showed him a diagram of some squares connected by lines. "This is a future chip," the exhibitor said, "that will hold six transistors on a single bit of silicon." Wozinak thought that he would be able to listen to a better transistor radio, but his father advised him that these "chips" would be hugely expensive and available only to the military. Ultimately, obsolete versions would trickle down to the consumer. Wozniak was embittered at that thought, but his curiousity was aroused. Now, he pointed out, it is the private sector--especially the computer and gaming industries--that are driving technology advances.

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