SIGNALScape

Information Technology Initiatives to Support Fuel Efficiency

May 16, 2011
By George Seffers

Dynamics Research Corporation, Andover, Massachusetts, recently announced that it has been awarded a four-year contract with the Air Mobility Command (AMC) Fuel Efficiency Office (FEO) Technical and Developmental Program Support Contract valued at nearly $4 million. Under the terms of the contract, DRC will provide technical and developmental program services supporting information technology initiatives to enhance the fuel efficiency of AMC operations and related mission decisions. DRC will work to automate manpower intensive processes, convert mission information into useable and relevant information and support changes in information technology functional requirements.

U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center Modifies CACI Contract

May 16, 2011
By George Seffers

CACI Systems Incorporated, Chantilly, Virginia, is being awarded a more than $7 million contract modification to exercise an option for services in support of the development, integration, test and evaluation, installation, fielding, certification, maintenance, life cycle and logistics support of command, control, computers, communications, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) electronic systems. This modification provides approximately 88,312 man-hours of support for the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division's Special Communications Requirements (SCR) Division. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

L-3 to Provide Camera Turrets for Persistent Ground Surveillance

May 16, 2011
By George Seffers

L-3 Communications Incorporated, Santa Rosa, California, is being awarded a nearly $9 million contract for the procurement of MX-15HDi camera turrets hardware in support of Phase III of the Persistent Ground Surveillance Systems for the U. S. Army.  Hardware to be procured includes 11 camera turrets and 15 custom cable kits. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity.

Raytheon Receives B-2 Antenna Parts Contract

May 16, 2011
By George Seffers

Raytheon Company of El Segundo, California, is being awarded a roughly $25 million contract for remanufactured B-2 aircraft antenna parts. The contracting activity is 448 Supply Chain Management Wing, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma.

GD Awarded U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory Contract

May 16, 2011
By George Seffers

General Dynamics Information Technology, Fairfax, Virginia, is being awarded a more than $45 million contract to provide Air Force Research Laboratory Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Technology division with a contract vehicle related to evolving materials and manufacturing technology. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

Defense Computing Goes To the Next Level: Up

May 13, 2011
By Beverly T. Schaeffer

For U.S. Defense Department computing to reach max efficiency, it's going to have to reach for the sky-the proverbial clouds, to be exact. But network transition takes time-and the process must be evolutionary for it to bring systems and users aboard smoothly.

Joint Integration and Flexibility Must Be Retained for Complex Road Ahead

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Leaders today are being called upon to shape the future in a very different budget environment than ever before, and this will have an impact on the Navy and all services. The challenge, according to Adm. Gary Roughead, USN, Chief of Naval Operations, is that none of us has ever had to lead in this environment. "We are in uncharted territory," he explained at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. And we must lead without any examples to look back upon, he added. The path ahead is to determine how we see the future unfolding and what we want the forces to do, the admiral recommended. From that, the leaders then can make the hard decisions. As leaders look at need and size, however, they have to keep in mind the nature of the industrial base. It is fragile, and it cannot be re-created if lost, he warned. "When the development of the joint strike fighter is done, it will mark the first time since World War I that there is not a new tactical aircraft under development," he related, adding that "You have to take a look at keeping that base going and how do you do that. It is complex and hard, but those are the cards that we are dealt," he acknowledged. For all that has changed in the budget environment, there are some constants in the world we live in that cannot be overlooked, and there is a continuing need for an offshore option that the U.S. Navy and the navies of the world will provide. The stakes of growing complexity and disorder are high, and joint integration has increasing value. "Our Navy today can fit into the context of joint force and coalition forces," the admiral stated. Global trade and economic interest will direct the interaction of all states, and the speed of this in the information age and the speed with which events develop will change the ability to lead these developments. "The Navy's small footprint and flexible range and platforms give the nation attractive options," the admiral noted.

The Allied Effect in Tight Budget Times

May 12, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman
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Defense is being underfunded by between 20 and 40 precent across Europe. This is an incredible reduction in defense spending, and frankly quite dangerous, said VAdm. Robert G. Cooling, Chief of Staff Allied Command Transportation at the AFCEA/USNI Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Virginia. In this environment, we all need allies, even the United States. Fighting along with NATO is better than fighting ad hoc. Future operations need to be politically supportable, which means having the populace behind you, he explained. He notes that trust among nations is a two-way street, and the all of government approach is a force multiplier. In all situations, interoperability is critical, he maintains. He gave credit to the United States as the force behind improving interoperability. It was critical to have it in Afghanistan, and it is showing to be successful in operations in Libya, he related. Addressing the topic of the Joint Forces Command disestablishment as part of the United States' cost-cutting measures, the admiral stressed that this disestablishment does not signal an end to transformation in Europe or in the United States. The foundation is solid, and the forces are the same. But where links become severed, ACT will create new links, he said. The admiral suggested that in the tight fiscal environment the industry is facing that the Framework For Collaborative Interaction might be an organization that could play an important role. The purpose of this group is to enable collaborative work to be carried out in a nonprocurement manner between ACT, industry and academia and to leverage the expertise that each party brings to Alliance capability development efforts. Despite budget considerations, NATO still has a lot of efforts underway.

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