Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

The SIGNAL Blog

A Small Chinese Navy Could Defeat a U.S. Fleet

February 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

China’s People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN), growing rapidly but still only a fraction of the size of the U.S. Navy, might be able to prevail in an ocean battle between the two forces. Several factors would work in China’s favor to tip the balance toward the Middle Kingdom in an intense regional conflict.

A panel devoted to China discussed how that might transpire on Thursday at West 2014 in San Diego. Dr. James R. Holmes, a professor of strategy and policy at the U.S. Naval War College, explained that the PLAN would be facing only a fraction of the entire U.S. Navy if conflict arose between the two. Any fight would occur in waters not far from China, so it could bring shore-based assets—such as aircraft and missiles—to bear against the U.S. fleet. These assets have ranges as far as hundreds of miles, which would put most U.S. naval forces responding to a crisis in the area well within their reach.

Holmes noted that China is building a maritime force capable of defeating U.S. forces in that region. “China’s is a maritime strategy, as opposed to a naval strategy, through and through,” he declared.

Ultimately, China may not even need to exercise force to fulfill its wishes. Holmes offers that an advanced PLAN may deter any U.S. involvement in an escalating regional dispute by convincing U.S. leaders that the price of involvement would be too great, or that winning would come at too high a cost.

Cooperation Needed on Commercial Technology Acquisition

February 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Buying commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology offers great advantages for both government and industry, but both parties could benefit from greater cooperation in this realm. This would help expand COTS into new areas, with resultant savings in cost and time to deployment.

Government Processes Hinder Foreign Military Sales

February 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

U.S. foreign military sales are less robust than they could be because existing rules are applied inconsistently, which in turn is compelling customers to buy less effective technologies from other nations. This trend has long-term negative implications for the U.S. defense industrial base, say industrial leaders.

Defense Department Needs New Business Model for Acquisition

February 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Defense Department needs a new acquisition model to speed systems to warfighters while maintaining an effective industrial base, said industry leaders. The current model, based on competition, actually is counterproductive for what the government hopes to accomplish for procurement.

Unmanned Systems Experience Growing Pains

February 11, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Unmanned systems for reconnaissance, surveillance and warfighting have grown so quickly in popularity that they are spawning a familiar list of challenges that must be met sooner rather than later. Many of these issues have arisen with other military technologies that became popular quickly, and planners found that fixing these problems was significantly more difficult the deeper the technologies were embedded in everyday military operations.

Cyberspace Domination May Determine Conflict Victor

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The realm of cyberspace, created by the United States, could be the undoing of its next major military operation unless the country regains control of its own creation. The virtual realm was let loose on the world where it was embraced by all manner of users, and some of them are counting on their expertise in it to overcome the overwhelming power of the U.S. military.

Navy Revamps Plans to Minimize Fleet Shortcomings

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Navy is developing a new fleet readiness plan that aims to enable more operations amid less funding. It is designed to avoid redundant activities or situations that might delay operations, and it will provide structure as well as flexibility in a coordinated effort across the fleet.

Marines Look to Special Forces

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Marine Corps is considering a new relationship with special operations forces as it faces a personnel drawdown, said a Marine Expeditionary Force commander. Lt. Gen. John Toolan, USMC, commanding general of the I Marine Expeditionary Force, told a Wednesday panel audience at West 2014 in San Diego that the Corps is looking harder at how it integrates with special operations forces.

 

Existing Navy Is the Template for the Future

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Navy of the future will strongly resemble the U.S. Navy of the present, according to a group of admirals. Budget cuts and changing missions are impelling the Navy to rely on its existing platforms and improve them by implementing new technologies.

Navy Seeks Balance Between Military, Commercial Technologies

February 12, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Navy must “achieve a balance” between using custom information technology and adopting commercial products, according to its chief information officer. Terry Halvorsen, appearing in the Wednesday keynote panel at West 2014 in San Diego, told the audience that this balance must weigh all factors in determining the Navy’s information technology direction.

Pages

Subscribe to The SIGNAL Blog