Asia-Pacific

November 14, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

People with attitudes represent the current bow wave of Web attacks.

November 14, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

The devil may be in the details of the electronics hardware as malware increasingly crashes hardware debuts.

November 14, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

The new strategic emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region poses a new set of challenges for the U.S. military, ranging from cyberspace attacks to missile defense in a large-scale conflict. Meeting these challenges will require a new approach to coalition building as well as a shift in technology procurement. And, the relationship among the United States, China and their neighbors will weigh heavily on all efforts for regional security. 

Many of these points were discussed on the first day of TechNet Asia-Pacific 2012, being held in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 13-15. Titled “Rebalancing Toward the Asia-Pacific—Challenges and Opportunities,” the conference began with a direct focus on the key issues that define those challenges.

 

 

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Commercial systems require commercial solutions to win the war in cyberspace.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Too much data security can be as much of a problem as too much secrecy when it comes to cyberspace operations.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Keeping assets safe from air and missile attack will require a coordinated defense coupled with a dispersal strategy.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Previous Asia military operations dealt with one or two warfighting domains; but that was a luxury that no longer is available.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Congressional action that limited U.S. activities with human rights violators is hurting Pacific Command efforts to build regional coalitions.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Pacific Command is considering new ways of countering the growing Chinese ballistic missile threat.

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

PACOM’s traditional model of bilateral coalitions in the Asia-Pacific region is giving way to larger groupings built on a regional basis.

 

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Most of the Pacific Command’s mission will focus on aiding others in need rather than warfighting efforts.

 

November 13, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

Under a new U.S. Asia-Pacific doctrine, friends don’t force friends to choose between Pacific superpowers. Nations can be friendly with both China and the United States.

 

November 1, 2012
By Kent R. Schneider

Sustaining U.S. Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense,” the new strategic guidance for the Defense Department, begins with a letter dated January 3, 2012, by President Obama. In this letter, the president states, “Our nation is at a moment of transition…. As commander in chief, I am determined that we meet the challenges of this moment responsibly and that we emerge even stronger in a manner that preserves American global leadership….

November 1, 2012
By Rita Boland
Ships from the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, the Republic of Korea Navy, and the U.S. Navy maneuver through the Pacific Ocean during a trilateral exercise. PACOM’s J-6 directorate is working to enhance coalition communications in its area of responsibility.

Cybersecurity remains the foremost concern for the man tasked with overseeing U.S. military communications technology in the Asia-Pacific area as the national defense strategy shifts focus to that region of the globe. New opportunities for technologies and programs are opening, but cyber issues continue to hold top billings in importance, and moves to shore up operations predate the recent official guidance.

November 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers

Cutting-edge warfighter technologies, ranging from nanoscience products to micro air vehicles, are advancing through the combined efforts of multinational top researchers within the Asia-Pacific region. This technical collaboration is driven in part by a U.S. Air Force research and development office in Tokyo, which is building international relationships while optimizing the intellectual talent within one of the world’s most active arenas for scientific breakthroughs.

November 1, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

The new U.S. strategic thrust toward the Asia-Pacific region is boosting longtime efforts in both coalition building and force projection. Bilateral alliances are evolving into multinational operations, and U.S. forces are increasing their forward deployed presence in quantity and capability.

October 1, 2012
By James C. Bussert

Recent improvements in Chinese destroyer technology have opened the door for greatly expanded surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, particularly for undersea operations. Advances range from new power plants and weapons to radars and sonars that provide versatility known to other modern navies. Many of these upgrades involve long-overdue improvements in warship operations. Electronics and missile advances acting synergistically are enabling new shipboard defense systems. But new sensor suites, particularly in sonars, are changing the nature of Chinese naval missions.

October 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

The expansion of the U.S. military presence in Guam is increasing the myriad challenges that U.S. forces face in that remote Pacific island. Guam’s location, time difference and tropical climate are significant factors as the U.S. military there grows in both size and importance.

October 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

The longtime, close relationship between the United States and Japan helped facilitate aid to the Asian nation stricken in March by the double blow of a powerful earthquake and a devastating tsunami.

October 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

The Australian Defence Department is in the midst of revolutionizing its submarine force with plans to replace its current fleet of six vessels with at least 12 new ones.

Pages