CIO

March 2, 2017

John Zangardi stepped in March 1 as the U.S. Defense Department’s acting chief information officer (CIO) following Terry Halvorsen’s retirement. Zangardi has served as the department’s principal deputy CIO since last October. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis has yet to name a permanent replacement for Halvorsen.

November 17, 2016
By George I. Seffers
Terry Halvorsen, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer, speaks about using cloud technology. Photo by Bob Goodwin

Taking advantage of the hybrid cloud environment is the smart thing to do, said Terry Halvorsen, U.S. Defense Department chief information officer.

“We would be completely stupid if we didn’t take advantage of hybrid cloud environment,” Halvorsen said while addressing audience at the AFCEA TechNet Asia-Pacific conference in Honolulu.

He went on to say the department will have a cloud solution providing a set of basic enterprise services, such as email, chat, video and file share. “They will be modeled after commercial, and it will be probably in partnership with a commercial provider,” he said.

August 9, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced Tuesday it has appointed David DeVries as its new chief information officer. DeVries now leaves the Defense Department, where he serves as the department’s principal deputy chief information officer under Terry Halvorsen.

September 16, 2015
By Sandra Jontz

As the Defense Department continues to forge closer relations with Silicon Valley, its leaders say they need more tools to improve automation of cyber basics, the department’s chief information officer (CIO) said. “At a certain point, I want to have some cyber defenses completely automated, where certain conditions occur and the system takes its own response,” said CIO Terry Halvorsen. “I think that is the only way we will keep up.” Automation would free up military and civilian cyber staff to concentrate on higher-level work.

March 9, 2015
By Sandra Jontz

Terry Halvorsen assumed duties as the permanent chief information officer for the U.S. Defense Department, a role he served in as the acting for nearly a year.

October 20, 2014
By Anthony Robbins

Network modernization is becoming a priority for defense agencies—and for good reason. Much of our defense network infrastructure was conceived 20 years ago and put into place almost a decade ago.

While the networks remain the same, the technologies that depend on them have advanced, and innovation can no longer be supported by outdated and ineffective infrastructure. Near real-time access to data enabled by the latest technologies and Internet-connected sensors can improve situational awareness for warfighters. They also build the foundation for more advanced communication and intelligent tactical networks that are crucial to the missions of our military.

September 25, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The Defense Department is planning a pilot study to determine the feasibility of a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) program within the department, says Terry Halvorsen, acting chief information officer.

“I think what we might be able to do is offer some set of services, probably email, maybe some file share, on a select number of commercial devices” for Defense Department military, civilian and contractors, and the department then could offer support services.

The impediment to enacting a department-wide approach has been policy issues, not a lack of technology.

December 8, 2010
By George Seffers

Dynamics Research Corporation recently announced a four-year, $20 million contract award to support the enterprise architecture needs of the Department of Homeland Security's Office of the Chief Information Officer. Awarded through the General Services Administration Alliant contract, the work will modernize the department's information technology assets and architecture, providing for collaboration across divisions and centralizing the capture and management of enterprise knowledge. The work ensures that the department's investments are cost-effective and mission-focused and that its information technology programs and assets are well-managed to maximize their return on investment.

September 23, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Having a single agency act as the cloud broker for the whole of the U.S. Defense Department's migration to commercial cloud services slowed the process too much, prompting a policy change to divvy up the duties among the services, says the department's acting chief information officer (CIO).

“The current status is [the Defense Information Systems Agency] DISA is still officially the cloud broker, because the memo is not out,” acting CIO Terry Halvorsen said Tuesday during a media roundtable discussion. “But we are going to make changes to DISA’s cloud broker role. The memo should be out by the end of October, maybe even a little sooner.