surveillance and reconnaissance

May 1, 2013
By Arthur Allen and Zdenka Willis
A U.S. Coast Guard helicopter delivers passengers from the sailing ship Bounty after the ship foundered during superstorm Sandy last October.

The synergy between operational planning and radar sensing provides enhanced search and rescue capabilities.

The U.S. Coast Guard is combining high-frequency coastal radar data with traditional oceanographic and geographic information to improve its chances of rescuing people in distress on the high seas. By merging these different sources of data, the Coast Guard enhances its search abilities while also providing better weather prediction for both its search and rescue teams and an endangered public in coastal areas.

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
A modernized and fully digitized unmanned aerial system could be performing vital missions over the Asia-Pacific region in the coming years. The upgraded Shadow system fielded by the U.S. Marine Corps could potentially play a major role in the region.

The upgraded RQ-7 could play a significant role in the Asia-Pacific region.

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
Future U.S. Army vehicles may be designed to carry common components that will decrease the size, weight and power consumption of electromagnetic systems while reducing costs and improving interoperability.

An upcoming demonstration could lead to a giant leap in common electromagnetic components.

March 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
Artist’s rendering of the Enhanced Medium Altitude Reconnaissance and Surveillance System scheduled for fielding to the U.S. Army in 2014. The system will provide enhanced connectivity to the Distributed Common Ground System-Army, the service branch’s premier intelligence enterprise.

The plug-and-play technology will close large capability gaps in the field.

The U.S. Army is developing the first airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platform fully enabled to connect analysts with the Distributed Common Ground System-Army. That system will help remedy problems currently hindering soldiers from having all data feed into a single repository. With the new aircraft, the process will be streamlined from the flying support, so information reaches ground commanders faster to facilitate more timely decision making.

February 25, 2013
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Navy technology may allow in-flight conversion from helicopter to fixed wing.

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory are developing unmanned aircraft technology that will allow the conversion from a vertical take-off and landing system to a fixed-wing craft during in-flight operation. The conversion capability will provide the take-off and landing flexibility of a helicopter with the longer range, higher speeds and lower wear and tear of an airplane.

February 1, 2013
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.
The Gorgon Stare sensor system is being mounted in Afghanistan on USAF/General Atomics Aeronautical Systems MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). This system from Exelis and Sierra Nevada Corporation can zoom in on and transmit up to 64 different images to soldiers on the ground.

Industry opens up an array of real-time imaging

Sweeping advances in sensor technologies are enabling wide-area airborne persistent surveillance on both manned and unmanned aircraft. Emerging sensor systems can provide high-resolution mosaic imagery for large swaths of the battlefield while focusing on individual objects.

November 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Northrop Grumman Corporation's X-47B is one contender for the U.S. Navy's carrier-based UAV program. The program is important to industry because it is currently the only large UAV platform being developed by the U.S. military.

The next five years will be as exciting as the last decade--but in a different way.

Unmanned vehicles will undergo an array of changes in the coming years brought about by the war in Afghanistan winding down, budgets tightening and the national strategy shifting toward the Asia-Pacific region. Adjustments may include the retirement of some unmanned air systems, a stronger focus on refining existing unmanned planes rather than fielding new ones and increased research and development of land and maritime technologies.

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

The National Intelligence University prepares for its fifth decade with a shift in focus and a change in venue.

July 16, 2012
By George Seffers

Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, was awarded a $14,338,925 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance services in Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, Mississippi, is the contracting activity.

March 1, 2012
By George Seffers

AAI Corporation, Hunt Valley, Maryland; CSC, Falls Church, Virginia; and Insitu Incorporated, Bingen, Washington, are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award contract for unmanned aircraft system (UAS) intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) services in support of the Department of Defense and other government agencies, as well as potential coalition military Foreign Military Sales customers. There are two separate performance-based work statements; one for sea-based requirements, and one for land-based requirements.

February 10, 2012
By George Seffers

Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, San Diego, California, is being awarded a potential $89,447,206 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, multiple award contract to provide research, development, test, and evaluation of emerging surveillance technologies, sensors and systems with potential for applicability in the areas of air, ground, and shipboard intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and information operations systems. Stanley Associates Incorporated, Fairfax, Virgina, is being awarded a a potential $77,775,689.

August 8, 2011
By George Seffers

Jorge Scientific Corporation, Arlington, Virginia, was awarded about $8 million for the research, development, and demonstration of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, munitions detection, and counter-improvised explosive device technological solutions to address deficiencies. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. There were 999 bids solicited, with 999 bids received. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

May 6, 2011
By George Seffers

Contrack International Incorporated, McLean, Virginia, has been awarded a $34 million contract for the design and construction of an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance complex in Shindand, Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Middle East District, Winchester, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

April 5, 2011
By George Seffers

Rockwell Collins Incorporated, Government Systems, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was awarded a $13 million contract to provide for the logistic and fielding support for the Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Network. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama is the contracting activity.

January 12, 2011
By George Seffers

Modus Operandi, Melbourne, Florida has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command to develop a system that identifies critical words and phrases for intelligence analysis, and maintains lists of these key words. The Vocabulary - Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (V-ISR) project, will address the challenges associated with processing overwhelming amounts of intelligence data.

December 29, 2010
By George Seffers

The Boeing Company, St. Louis, Missouri, was recently awarded a $68 million contract for full-motion video from commercial unmanned air intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms across Iraq. Work will be completed in Baghdad, Iraq. U.S. Central Command, Contracting Command, Baghdad, Iraq, is the contracting activity.

Tuesday, December 02, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

U.S. Army researchers are taking the extended view as they plan near- and long-term intelligence and surveillance systems. New sensor suites are being designed to serve future requirements involving advanced data fusion and new approaches to situational awareness.

December 2009
By Rita Boland

Seeing in the dark is a mere basic function of two versions of next-generation goggles, one preparing to roll out to troops and another in an early development stage. Researchers have combined image intensifier and infrared technology in one monocular device to offer troops improved sight capabilities in any light condition. As the U.S. Army prepares to expand the use of those tools from a few select units to a wider soldier population, it also is looking to the future. The next version of the goggles will digitize displays and enable users to pass and receive information to and from other sensors on the battlefield.

December 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

Nine U.S. naval organizations are collaborating to increase the agility of communications to sailors and Marines conducting distributed operations in ground and littoral environments. Using a combination of manned and unmanned engagement platforms and integrated sensors, the system of systems not only will boost warfighters’ situational awareness but also will enable them to engage hostile forces remotely at the tactical level. This organic land, sea and air intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability provides long-distance over-the-horizon communications capabilities and feeds into both lethal and nonlethal weapons. As a result, commanders will have a variety of immediate offensive and defensive options.

Pages