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surveillance and reconnaissance

Era of Change for 
Unmanned Systems

November 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers

The next five years will be as exciting as the last decade--but in a different way.

Unmanned vehicles will undergo an array of changes in the coming years brought about by the war in Afghanistan winding down, budgets tightening and the national strategy shifting toward the Asia-Pacific region. Adjustments may include the retirement of some unmanned air systems, a stronger focus on refining existing unmanned planes rather than fielding new ones and increased research and development of land and maritime technologies.

The U.S. military will not be fielding many new unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to the current war, but the situation is not all gloom and doom, says Dyke Weatherington, director, Unmanned Warfare and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, Strategic and Tactical Systems in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics. “The last 10 years have been very dynamic. We’ve seen rapid growth and huge increases in force structure. My guess is that the next five years will be equally dynamic in a different way. There’s huge potential for continued capability increases in ISR [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] for the warfighter. I just think that’s going to look a little different than it has in the last 10 years.”

For the most part, that means the U.S. military will take capabilities it already has for UAVs and refine those as much as possible. Improvements could include fielding new capabilities to existing platforms, enhancing current payloads or reducing ownership costs, he explains.

Writing
 a New Spy School
 Syllabus

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

The National Intelligence University prepares for its fifth decade with a shift in focus and a change in venue.

The National Intelligence University, which provides advanced training to U.S. intelligence professionals, is transitioning from an institution primarily focused on the U.S. Defense Department to one serving the entire intelligence community. This reflects the new emphasis toward sharing and collaboration within the nation's intelligence apparatus.

To make the change a reality, National Intelligence University (NIU) leaders are rethinking and expanding the educational programs the institution offers. Plans also are underway to relocate the university to its own new campus in the very near future—in part to bolster its perception as an intelligence community strategic resource.

Dr. David R. Ellison, president of the NIU, says that the change began with the appointment of James Clapper as the director of National Intelligence in 2010. “Director Clapper recognized that if we were going to have a National Intelligence University in the intelligence community, the best place to start was with an accredited institution that had already achieved success in an academic area,” Ellison explains. He adds that Clapper went on to draft a memorandum to then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, defining education as a force multiplier and a tool that must be used to the advantage of the entire intelligence community.

“What he envisioned was that the then-National Intelligence College would become the National Intelligence University, and it would provide accredited education, academic research and academic outreach to the intelligence community as a whole,” Ellison points out.

SAIC to Provide Airborne ISR in Afghanistan

July 16, 2012
By George Seffers

Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, was awarded a $14,338,925 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the airborne intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance services in Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, Mississippi, is the contracting activity.

Three Firms to Compete for $874 Million in Airborne ISR Funds

March 1, 2012
By George Seffers

AAI Corporation, Hunt Valley, Maryland; CSC, Falls Church, Virginia; and Insitu Incorporated, Bingen, Washington, are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award contract for unmanned aircraft system (UAS) intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) services in support of the Department of Defense and other government agencies, as well as potential coalition military Foreign Military Sales customers. There are two separate performance-based work statements; one for sea-based requirements, and one for land-based requirements. The scope includes provision of necessary trained personnel, UAS ISR non-developmental equipment, certifications, installation, operation, maintenance, sustainment, spares/product support, and other related support services necessary to support various worldwide sea- and land-based locations. The aggregate not-to-exceed amount for these multiple award contracts is $874 million. The companies will have the opportunity to compete for associated task orders. AAI and Insitu are eligible to compete for both sea-based and land-based task orders. CSC is only eligible to compete for land-based task orders. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Five Firms to Research and Develop ISR Technologies

February 10, 2012
By George Seffers

Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, San Diego, California, is being awarded a potential $89,447,206 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, multiple award contract to provide research, development, test, and evaluation of emerging surveillance technologies, sensors and systems with potential for applicability in the areas of air, ground, and shipboard intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and information operations systems. Stanley Associates Incorporated, Fairfax, Virgina, is being awarded a a potential $77,775,689. General Dynamics Information Technology Incorporated, Fairfax, Virginia, could receive as much as $76,559,590. Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, will receive a potential $72,642,658, and L-3 Services Incorporated, Mount Laurel, New Jersey, could receive $62,640,527. Awardees will compete for task orders during the ordering period. Each contract includes one two-year option. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity.

Jorge Scientific to Demonstrate Explosive Detection Technologies for Afghanistan

August 8, 2011
By George Seffers

Jorge Scientific Corporation, Arlington, Virginia, was awarded about $8 million for the research, development, and demonstration of intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, munitions detection, and counter-improvised explosive device technological solutions to address deficiencies. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. There were 999 bids solicited, with 999 bids received. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Contrack to Build ISR Complex in Afghanistan

May 6, 2011
By George Seffers

Contrack International Incorporated, McLean, Virginia, has been awarded a $34 million contract for the design and construction of an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance complex in Shindand, Afghanistan. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Middle East District, Winchester, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

Rockwell Collins Supports Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Network

April 5, 2011
By George Seffers

Rockwell Collins Incorporated, Government Systems, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was awarded a $13 million contract to provide for the logistic and fielding support for the Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Network. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama is the contracting activity.

Modus Operandi to Develop Key Word Identifier

January 12, 2011
By George Seffers

Modus Operandi, Melbourne, Florida has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command to develop a system that identifies critical words and phrases for intelligence analysis, and maintains lists of these key words. The Vocabulary - Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (V-ISR) project, will address the challenges associated with processing overwhelming amounts of intelligence data. The V-ISR project will use advanced, machine-learning techniques to recognize new terms and automatically categorize them within lists that will be constantly updated. Until now, intelligence analysts have had to manually identify new terms and add them to key word lists, a time consuming and error-prone process.

Boeing Receives Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Full-Motion Video Contract

December 29, 2010
By George Seffers

The Boeing Company, St. Louis, Missouri, was recently awarded a $68 million contract for full-motion video from commercial unmanned air intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms across Iraq. Work will be completed in Baghdad, Iraq. U.S. Central Command, Contracting Command, Baghdad, Iraq, is the contracting activity.

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