DISA

August 19, 2010
By George Seffers

ManTech International Corporation recently announced that it has received a $23 million contract to support the U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) Manpower, Personnel and Security Division. ManTech will support the start-up of new DISA facilities at Fort Meade, Maryland, for operations relocating from Arlington, Virginia. Specifically, ManTech will support DISA's security operations by providing full-scope, integrated security services.

June 29, 2010
By George Seffers

The Defense Information Systems Agency issued a bridge extension for three Joint Interoperability Test Command multiple-award Omnibus contracts-two held by Northrop Grumman, and another by Interop Joint Venture II. Set to expire August 31, the contracts will be extended six months with three two-month option periods. The extension will add up to $70 million to each contract, changing the total contract ceilings from $1.05 billion to $1.12 billion.

June 9, 2010
By Henry Kenyon

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), Washington, D.C., has chosen Henry Sienkiewicz as chief information officer and Paige Atkins as director of DISA's Strategic Planning and Information Directorate.

April 2010
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

A brand new way of doing business and a contract estimated to be worth more than $5 billion over 10 years is bound to cause some discussion. And that is exactly what is happening in vociferous debate and hushed tones between government agencies and the companies that supply the satellite communications lifeline to today’s warfighters. At issue is the wisdom of moving from buying time on commercial satellites from a limited number of providers to the ability to purchase megabits per month the same way agencies buy office supplies.
The genesis of this new line of reasoning began in 2008. The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA), Arlington, Virginia, and the General Services Administration (GSA), Washington, D.C., launched their initial discussions about commercial satellite communications (COMSATCOM) services. The Future COMSATCOM Services Acquisition (FCSA) program is the result of two years of cost analysis, requirements reckoning and acquisition strategy meetings that resulted in an announcement last August that the two organizations were creating a common marketplace for COMSATCOM.

April 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

With fuel serving as the ammunition of the mobile force, the Defense Information Systems Agency has created a new capability that allows logisticians to track and manage different types of this valuable resource. A new version of the agency’s Web-based Global Combat Support System-Joint has been deployed to fulfill this top priority of the U.S. Central Command J-4.

April 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Defense Information Systems Agency is confronting the uncertain future of warfare by aiming to provide its customers with whatever choices they may need to deal with whatever future they may face. The goal is to allow them to choose their information services instead of force them into systems that might be ineffective when a new type of conflict emerges.

March 5, 2010
By Katie Packard

"The difference there is that we don't want to prioritize and think just in terms of 'how do we secure information' without thinking through our real objective of assuring support for DOD missions."--Mark Orndorff, director of the PEO for Mission Assurance and Network Operations, DISA

January 27, 2010
By Beverly Schaeffer

Cyber denizens meet on DEFStar-an innovative social media site geared toward government and military.

October 21, 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

Tony Montemarano, component acquisition executive, DISA, revealed that the agency is working on a campaign plan in which the word "convergence" is used time and time again.

August 7, 2009
By Henry Kenyon

Top Defense Information Systems Agency officials met with industry today to share their strategy and plans for the future.

August 7, 2009

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and the General Services Administration (GSA) have entered into a partnership to streamline acquisition of commercial satellite communications (SATCOM) services. Announced yesterday, the agreement will lead to a hybrid of GSA's multiple award schedules and indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (ID/IQ) contracts. Officials of both organizations are lauding this collaborative effort as "historic" and agree that the Future Commercial SATCOM Access contract will be worth $5 billion over a 10-year period.

April 14, 2009
By Beverly Schaeffer

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has had to juggle technologies to maintain effective service to its customers-the defense community. Both civilian and military Defense Department organizations depend on DISA for vital connectivity around the clock and around the globe. While the agency has been able to tap commercial capabilities to a greater degree, its customer demands-especially for bandwidth-have been growing faster than expected.

April 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

Leaps in technology innovation and changes in the business enterprise climate are transforming the military’s view of its primary information systems provider. Network stability, computing advances, increased financial transparency, enhanced governance and the compelling need to modernize systems are key instigators in this new perception—and exciting opportunities are likely to keep it going. But because supplying warfighters with bleeding-edge technologies quickly, flexibly and robustly can be an elusive goal, work continues in earnest to remain one step ahead of the next requirement.

April 2009
By Rita Boland

Keeping networks secure is one of the most important and challenging tasks for the U.S. Defense Department as it continues its morph into a network-centric force. The Defense Information Systems Agency’s Field Security Operations Division has the responsibility for ensuring the strength of those networks by certifying and testing them against threats. A few recent, and some gradual, changes have occurred to streamline the security process, as more systems connect into the Global Information Grid. The review process involves multiple levels of urgency along with a range of possible violations.

May 2008
By Rita Boland

The Defense Information Systems Agency has transformed its acquisition policy over the past several years, and the success of the new method has resulted in cost savings and faster deployments of capabilities. As new programs—both large and small—advance, the agency plans to be as open as possible with industry in an effort to create synergy that will generate the best solutions.

May 2008
By Rita Boland

A major Defense Information Systems Agency program is serving as a transformational change agent for the U.S. Defense Department by blazing a path toward the much desired network-centric method of data sharing. The system, which enables military information exchange in a trusted environment with dynamic and flexible users and needs, already has begun providing capabilities to customers. It is about to enter the initial operational test and evaluation phase.

May 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

Not content with being a global service provider, the Defense Information Systems Agency is striving to extend its network to take advantage of new capabilities that it is introducing into the force. Many of these new capabilities magnify the power of the network as it reaches the tactical edge, and they may change the nature of communications and information flow.

April 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

Invisible conflicts are erupting on the battlefield as U.S. and coalition troops compete for precious electromagnetic spectrum. These e-turf wars may be silent, but they can be as deadly as enemy fire when warfighters have to choose between disarming an improvised explosive device and calling for close-air support. To resolve this conflict, the U.S. Defense Department now has an organization whose primary mission is to ensure that all warfighters have the spectrum they need when they need it.

April 2007
By Rita Boland

The U.S. military is reducing excess and providing capabilities to personnel faster by implementing nontraditional contracts. The new arrangements allow the military to pay only for what it needs when it needs it and to take advantage of existing tools instead of duplicating efforts. The contracts enable the force to skip the cumbersome acquisition process and scale up services more quickly.

April 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

The convergence of media and services in commercial cyberspace has its counterpart in the defense arena, where experts are tapping commercial technologies and standards to provide seamless information access to warfighters and decision makers.

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