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information operations

Test Your Network Security Knowledge

April 15, 2013

SANS NetWars, an interactive security challenge, gives participants the chance to compete while earning continuing education units (CEUs) to help sustain certifications. The event will take place May 15 and 16, 2013, at the Virginia Beach Convention Center during AFCEA’s East: Joint Warfighting event.

Multiple Firms Awarded C5ISR Funds

April 5, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Booz Allen Hamilton Engineering Services LLC, Annapolis, Md.; Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., McLean, Va.; CACI Inc. – Federal, Chantilly, Va.; Centurum Information Technology Inc., Marlton, N.J.; Computer Sciences Corp., Falls Church, Va.; Glotech Inc., Rockville, Md.; Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc., Columbia, Md.; Engility Corp., Mount Laurel, N.J.; Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Solutions, Herndon, Va.; M.C. Dean Inc., Dulles, Va.; Qinetiq North America Inc., Services and Solutions Group, Fairfax, Va.; Science Applications International Corp., McLean, Va.; Sotera Defense Solutions Inc., Virginia Beach, Va.; Scientific Research Corp., Atlanta; and ManTech Systems Engineering Corp., Fairfax, Va., are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, performance-based multiple award contract with provisions for fixed-price-incentive and firm-fixed-price task orders. The contracts are for the procurement of decision superiority support services including the entire spectrum of non-inherently governmental services and solutions (equipment and services) associated with the full system lifecycle support, including research, development, test, evaluation, production and fielding of sustainable, secure, survivable, and interoperable command, control, communication, computers, combat systems, intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (C5ISR), information operations, enterprise information services and space capabilities. The cumulative, estimated ceiling value of the base year is $179,957,600. These contracts include options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative ceiling value of these contracts to an estimated $899,788,000. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity. 

Advanced Capabilities Required for Future Navy Warfighting

April 4, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Future conflicts likely will be fought in degraded information technology environments, which will require the U.S. Navy to develop and exploit new capabilities to continue to operate in contested cyberspace. Technologies such as a flexible information grid, assured timing services and directed energy weapons must be part of the naval information system arsenal if the sea service is to maintain information dominance through the year 2028.

These were just a few of the findings presented in the Navy’s Information Dominance Roadmap 2013-2028, which was released in late March. Presented by Rear Adm. William E. Leigher, USN, the Navy’s director of warfighter integration, the report outlines the growing challenges facing the fleet and how the Navy must meet them.

The report divides information dominance challenges into three areas: assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness and integrated fires. While the United States will continue to maintain supremacy in those areas, that supremacy is shrinking as more nations are closing the gap between U.S. capabilities and the ability to disrupt them.

Among the advanced capabilities the Navy will require toward the end of the next decade is assured electromagnetic spectrum access. Achieving this will entail fielding greater numbers of advanced line-of-sight communication systems; being able to monitor combat system operational status and adjust it using automated services; having a real-time spectrum operations capability that enables dynamic monitoring and control of spectrum emissions; and generating a common operational picture of the spectrum that is linked to electronic navigation charts and displays operational restrictions.

Consolidation Is 
the Course for Army 
Electronic Warfare

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Melding the disciplines of spectrum combat will enable greater flexibility and more capabilities.

The growth in battlefield electronics has spurred a corresponding growth in electronic warfare. In the same manner that innovative technologies have spawned new capabilities, electronic warfare is becoming more complex as planners look to incorporate new systems into the battlespace.

No longer can electronic warfare (EW) function exclusively in its own domain. The growth of cyber operations has led to an overlap into traditional EW areas. EW activities for countering remote-controlled improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Southwest Asia led to an increased emphasis on EW defense and offense. It also exposed the problem of signal fratricide when those EW operations interfered with allied communication.

The U.S. Army sped many systems into theater, and now it is working to coordinate those technologies into a more organized capability. The effort focuses on an integrated EW approach that will reconcile many of the existing conflicts and clear the way for more widespread use of EW in future conflicts.

“The Army definitely has wrapped its arms around the importance of EW,” declares Col. Joe DuPont, USA, project manager for electronic warfare at the Program Executive Office (PEO) Intelligence Electronic Warfare and Sensors (IEWS), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

The majority of the Army’s EW assets currently come from quick reaction capabilities (QRCs) that have been fielded over the past decade; these capabilities are attack, support and protection. The requirements largely came from theater, and the next systems due for fielding reflect those requests.

Information Security Scholarships Available

November 21 ,2012
By Maryann Lawlor

The (ISC)2 Foundation’s information security 2013 scholarship program application process will open on January 1, 2013, offering a total of $120,000 in awards to women, graduate students, young professionals and faculty.

 

Multiple Firms to Provide Battlespace Awareness Contracts

November 5, 2012
George I. Seffers

Management Services Group Inc. dba Global Technical Systems, Virginia Beach, Va.; Sentek Consulting Inc. dba Sentek Global, San Diego; Skylla Engineering Ltd., Humble, Texas; and UEC Electronics, Hanahan, S.C., are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, performance-based, multiple award contracts, with provisions for fixed-price-incentive and firm-fixed-price orders, to provide battle space awareness services including the integration and test of systems of systems focused on the delivery of battlespace awareness, and intelligence capabilities and systems as well as the integrated employment of information operations (IO) capabilities, and also the development, integration, and test of intelligence, battlespace awareness, and information operations applications and dedicated hardware. The cumulative, estimated value of the base year is $19,750,000. Contract funds in the amount of $10,000 will be obligated on this award. These contracts include options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of these multiple award contracts to an estimated $98,760,000. These four contractors may compete for the task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contracts. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, Charleston, S.C., is the contracting activity. 

Writing
 a New Spy School
 Syllabus

October 1, 2012
By Max Cacas

The National Intelligence University prepares for its fifth decade with a shift in focus and a change in venue.

The National Intelligence University, which provides advanced training to U.S. intelligence professionals, is transitioning from an institution primarily focused on the U.S. Defense Department to one serving the entire intelligence community. This reflects the new emphasis toward sharing and collaboration within the nation's intelligence apparatus.

To make the change a reality, National Intelligence University (NIU) leaders are rethinking and expanding the educational programs the institution offers. Plans also are underway to relocate the university to its own new campus in the very near future—in part to bolster its perception as an intelligence community strategic resource.

Dr. David R. Ellison, president of the NIU, says that the change began with the appointment of James Clapper as the director of National Intelligence in 2010. “Director Clapper recognized that if we were going to have a National Intelligence University in the intelligence community, the best place to start was with an accredited institution that had already achieved success in an academic area,” Ellison explains. He adds that Clapper went on to draft a memorandum to then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, defining education as a force multiplier and a tool that must be used to the advantage of the entire intelligence community.

“What he envisioned was that the then-National Intelligence College would become the National Intelligence University, and it would provide accredited education, academic research and academic outreach to the intelligence community as a whole,” Ellison points out.

Several Firms Awarded Information Operations Contract

February 13, 2012
By George Seffers

AT and T, Vienna, Virginia; EWA, Herndon, Virginia; Macaulay Brown, Dayton, Ohio; Northrop Grumman, Chantilly, Virginia; SAIC, McLean, Virginia; SRC Incorporated, Chantilly, Virginia; Scientific Research Company, Atlanta, Georgia; and URS, Germantown, Maryland, are being awarded a firm-fixed-price multiple award contract for professional, technical, and analytical support in the mission areas of information assurance and information operations (IO). Support services include the core capabilities of IO: electronic warfare, computer network operations, psychological operations, military deception, and operations security. The contract includes support for missions, functions, and tasks related to signal intelligence; strategic, operational and tactical planning; operational support and reachback; database/library management, fleet IO requirements; experimentation, tactics evaluation, and doctrine development; systems assessment; information technology management and administration; engineering and technical services; and management and professional support services. The aggregate not-to-exceed amount, including the base period and four option years, for all eight contracts combined is $99,926,183. These companies will have the opportunity to bid on individual task orders. The Fleet Logistics Center Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

MacAulay Brown to Develop Electronic Warfare Technologies

September 26, 2011
By George Seffers

MacAulay-Brown Incorporated, Dayton, Ohio, is being awarded a $24,891,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to design, develop, and test innovation involving apertures, receivers, exciters, signal processing, and algorithms for signal intelligence, threat warning, direction finding, information operations, electronic attack, electronic support, and electronic protection applications. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity.

PacificTech-Sauer to Build Information Operations Center at Fort Bragg

August 15, 2011
By George Seffers

PacificTech-Sauer J.V., Jacksonville, Florida, was awarded a more than $9 million firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of an operational communications facility to be used as the Joint Communication Unit Headquarters and Information Operations Facility at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Georgia, is the contracting activity.

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