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Budget Constraints Top Cyber Attacks as Biggest Threat to IT Infrastructure

October 3, 2013
By Rachel Lilly

Would you rather be stuck in an elevator for 24 hours or have your network hacked? According to a new survey, 71 percent of government information technology decision makers think the elevator is a more appealing choice. But improving security still ranks second to the most important technology goal in the coming year—reducing costs.

The survey, conducted for Cisco by Clarus Research Group in early September, involved 400 decision makers from federal, state and local government. It’s little surprise in the current fiscal environment that a majority of respondents identified budget constraints as the greatest threat to their organization’s information technology infrastructure, topping cyber attacks, employee personal devices on the network, an increased demand for constituent services and limited network bandwidth. And 22 percent volunteered an “all of the above” statement, pointing to a combination of threats.

Despite budget reductions, 59 percent of information technology decision makers plan to amp up investments in cybersecurity with 45 percent increasing investments in the cloud. The increase in cybersecurity and cloud funding was expected, especially on the federal side, says Larry Payne, area vice president, U.S. federal sales, Cisco. In the state and local sector, investments in networking are expected to increase more rapidly than other areas.

Hawkins: Mobility As a Disruptive Technology

By Max Cacas

Lt. Gen. Ronnie Hawkins, USAF, Director of the Defense Information Systems Agency, always sees mobile through the eyes of a warfighter. “Mobility means a lot of things to a lot of different people,” he told the inaugural edition of the “AFCEA Answers” radio program (listen here). “When we look at it from the perspectives of what we do in the Joint Information Environment, we see it as one of the disruptive technologies that we’re bringing to bear.”
 
Gen. Hawkins says mobile gives the military the ability to, “move information where ever we need to move it, and also be able to do it from a platform that does not tie us to a desk.” And it puts that information, he adds, anywhere the warfighter might need it.
 
One of the top challenges for delivering that information to the warfighter in theater is keeping data secure, according to Kevin Manwiller with CISCO Systems. “Security is top of mind anytime you are bringing mobile devices onto the network,” he says, adding that industry needs to develop commercial off-the-shelf solutions to do that.  
 
CISCO’s Mike Mulville adds, “The always-there, anywhere, always on, no matter where you go, whether its secure or unsecure, those are the kinds of challenges that we in industry are trying to meet.”
 
What does mobile mean to you? Do you agree it’s a disruptive technology, or is it a productivity enabler?
 
Got a question? Got an answer? AFCEA Answers wants to hear from you – join in the conversation!

DISA Forum: Complexity, Video, Security on the IT Horizon

August 18, 2011
By Max Cacas

John Chambers, CEO of internet router manufacturer CISCCO, told the DISA Customer and Industry Forum in Baltimore that "Collaboration will be the productivity tool of the next decade."

Webinar: Securing the Data Center

April 23, 2009
By Henry Kenyon

Next in SIGNAL's webinar series, "Securing the Data Center: A DOD Architecture for Information Assurance" will take place on May 7, 2009 at 11:00 AM ET. Targeted attacks by hackers and insiders are aimed where they'll do the most damage and where the most valuable assets are located - the agency data center. Government agencies can increase protection and reduce operational costs when security issues are considered at the very beginning of data center planning. So it's ironic that data center security is often an afterthought. A well thought-out defense-in-depth strategy includes multiple layers of security and different overlapping technologies.

Attendees will learn how a secure data center architecture can:

  • Enable secure rollout of Web 2.0 and SOA services
  • Achieve Policy and Regulatory Compliance
  • Protect Data and Communication Integrity & Privacy
  • Enable Secure Email and Web Transactions
  • Prevent Data Leakage and Disclosure
  • Provide Comprehensive Threat Control

Panelists include:

  • Rich Campbell, Senior Systems Engineer, Cisco Data Center Solutions
  • Andrew Benhase, Consulting Systems Engineer, Cisco Security Solutions
  • Michael Jones, Federal Security Services Manager, Cisco Federal Services

For additional details, including how to register, click here.

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