Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

Homefront Help

Homefront Help: Operation Covert Santa

December 6, 2012
By Rita Boland

Ever wanted to be one of Santa's elves? Here's the perfect chance to try it out and help wounded warriors at the same time. Operation Covert Santa gathers the wish lists from recently injured troops and their families, removes all identifying information and asks volunteers to supply the presents. All the gifts are given and received anonymously. It isn't charity—it's the magic of Christmas.

Last year, more than 175 elves provided presents for 74 severely injured soldiers and their families. People who want to participate this year can help in several ways:

Donate cash by sending a check made out to the Aleethia Foundation at:

Aleethia Foundation

Operation Covert Santa

1718 M Street NW Suite 1170

Washington DC 20036

Put "Operation Covert Santa VI" in the memo line.

Or

Go to the Aleethia Foundation website and donate electronically by choosing "Ed Meagher's Covert Santa Program." Whether you send a check or use the Web option, email Ed Meagher at huskyelf@cox.net with "Cash Donation" in the subject line so the program can know how much to budget.

Elves also can sign up to buy a single gift, support an individual soldier, or adopt a small or large family. Send an email to the huskyelf@cox.net address with the appropriate choice in the subject line. Participants then will receive the information about what to buy, so they can shop for it, wrap it and put on the number they will receive. The packages can be delivered in person or shipped to:

Operation Covert Santa

453 Walker Road

Great Falls, Virginia 22066

Donations are requested as soon as possible but no later than December 16. Email Ed Meagher for more information.






Homefront Help: The United Heroes Campaign

November 29, 2012
Rita Boland

Donating to many of the country’s most prominent military charities now is a little bit easier. More than 100 such organizations have come together on The United Heroes Campaign to give people a one-stop shop for giving back. Visitors to the site can choose to share a single or recurring gift with one or more of the charities listed. They can also decide to have their donations shared equally among all the charities. The groups participating cover a range of needs in the military community including wounded warriors, survivors of those killed in action and support for troops currently overseas.

Not sure where to give? No problem. Use the See the Charities link to view a list of all the participating organizations and then click on any one of them to read a description.

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s senior news editor.

Veterans Day

November 9, 2012

U.S. veterans—on the day our nation sets aside especially for you, we at SIGNAL want to say thank you for all you’ve done overseas and domestically to make life better for everyone who lives here. From fighting vicious enemies to rescuing people during natural disasters, you step up when others run. We appreciate the sacrifice of you and your families. Welcome home.

 

Homefront Help: Thank You for My Freedom Campaign

November 8, 2012
By Rita Boland

The National WWII Museum has launched the Thank You for My Freedom campaign to give the public a chance to share videos, photos and words of appreciation to support the nation’s veterans. Efforts center around the www.myveteransday.org website, where people can upload their messages and see what others have posted. Participants also can text THANKS to 51555 or send their messages to the museum’s Twitter and Facebook pages. The work leads up to the museum’s Veterans Day celebrations on November 10 and 11. Organizers want to gather a million thank-yous for U.S. military veterans. So pull out those smartphones and start getting creative!

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s senior news editor.

 

 

Homefront Help: Stand Up for Heroes

November 1, 2012
Rita Boland

Turns out that supporting the military just might be a laughing matter. Stand Up for Heroes is an evening of comedy and music during the New York Comedy Festival put on to build morale among and raise money for wounded warfighters, veterans and their families. The funds go to the Bob Woodruff Foundation, a nonprofit organization investing in national and community-based programs that connect members of the military community with help they need.

This year’s event takes place at the Beacon Theatre on Thursday, November 8, at 8 p.m. It will honor the sacrifices of troops and their families, offering support in the effort to heal physically and psychologically from war. Many big-name acts are scheduled to perform including Robin Williams, Jon Stuart and Bruce Springsteen. Individual tickets have sold out, but corporate sponsor packages and VIP benefit packages are available. For more information email SUFH@remind.org.

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s senior news editor.
 

 

Homefront Help: Battleship Trick or Treat

October 18, 2012
Rita Boland

The Battleship NORTH CAROLINA—the decommissioned USS North Carolina—invites the public to an onboard Halloween bash on October 30, 2012. The fun includes sweet treats, a petting zoo, temporary tattoos, caricatures and a bounce house, not to mention a chance to celebrate the holiday within a piece of classic U.S. military history.

Located in Wilmington, North Carolina, the ship’s Halloween festivities begin at 5:30 p.m. and last until 8 p.m. The cost is $5 per person. Kids two years old or younger get in free.

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s news editor.

Homefront Help: Marine Corps Heritage Foundation Awards

October 11, 2012
Rita Boland

The nomination period is now open for the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation 2013 awards. Each year, the foundation honors Marines and civilians who have carried out exemplary work in advancing or preserving Marine Corps history, life, culture and work. Winners will be honored at a ceremony next April. They also will receive a $1,000 cash prize, a medallion and a commemorative brick along the Semper Fidelis Memorial Park pathway at the Marine Corps Heritage Center.

Achievements in literature, art, photography, videography and museum exhibits all can earn recognition. Award categories include historical scholarship, journalism, and letters and arts for a total of 15 awards.

Applicants can nominate themselves or other individuals can nominate someone they believe deserves an award. The deadline for submissions is January 9, 2013. Visit the contest website for more information.

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s news editor.

Homefront Help: About Face

October 4, 2012
Rita Boland

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains one of the biggest causes of suffering for troops who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has launched a Web resource to reach out to people who need help handling the affliction, calling on fellow veterans to lend support. On About Face, visitors can find all the expected basics, such as an explanation of the disorder, contact information for immediate help and links to more information. But the true value of the site is in its collections of videos featuring veterans talking about their struggles and offering words of encouragement to others.

The video testimonials cover many of the topics important to people with PTSD including how it can affect loved ones, what treatment is like and why individuals did not seek help immediately. Many veterans or active-duty military members dealing with this disorder feel alone or nervous that seeking help will reflect poorly on them. Through About Face, they can see how many of their peers experience the same issues and hopefully feel less isolated and uncertain.

Though much of the VA’s efforts focus on the troops returning from current conflicts, the site, and the department’s resources, are for veterans who served in any U.S. operation.

Homefront Help also has a Facebook page where visitors can gather and share information. If you know of a program that is helping service personnel, veterans or their families please submit that information to Rita Boland, SIGNAL’s news editor.

Troops Sing a Different Tune With Warrior Cry

September 20, 2012
By Rita Boland

Normally Homefront Help stories focus on the need-to-know information. But every so often an opportunity arises to take an in-depth look at the dedicated manner in which people across the country use diverse skill sets and interests to serve the military community. Such is the case with Warrior Cry--an all-volunteer group that provides musical instruments to wounded warfighters and helps find musicians to provide instructions when requested.

"The [injured troops] are trying to get over something very dramatic," Robert Henne, Warrior Cry's founder and president, says. "They're dealing with red tape on their care, their checks. They're trying to figure out if they'll be homeless. I don't want them having to buy ... anything related to the music. The music is supposed to be therapeutic." Ideally, the time patients spend with instruments should be fun and casual. "My goal is to make them 15 again," Henne explains. "Sitting there in the garage, jamming with their buddies, talking about girls."

Though Warrior Cry serves men and women, Henne says that 99 percent of the patients he encounters are male. The group's tagline--Chicks dig guitars and scars--grew partly out of this fact. But the tongue-in-cheek statement also represents a portion of what Warrior Cry wants to do--help troops with severe injuries feel normal, which includes feeling attractive again. An experience that particularly touched Henne involved an 18-year-old service member who had lost both his legs and wanted a guitar. He shared with Henne that his lower body is scarred and covered in skin grafts, but if he can sit around a campfire with pants on, playing a guitar, girls can get to know him and what he still has to offer, which is more than just being an amputee. He worries that because of his wounds, "No one is going to love me. I want them to love me."

Hotels For Heroes

September 13, 2012
By Rita Boland

Administered by Fisher House, Hotels for Heroes offers free hotel rooms to wounded, injured or ill service members and their families in certain situations.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Homefront Help