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EPIC Speaker Series Explores Intelligence and Congress

April 15, 2013

The Emerging Professionals in Intelligence Committee (EPIC), one of AFCEA’s services to young professionals, sponsors its first speaker series event that will delve into congressional funding practices.

Test Your Network Security Knowledge

April 15, 2013

SANS NetWars, an interactive security challenge, gives participants the chance to compete while earning continuing education units (CEUs) to help sustain certifications. The event will take place May 15 and 16, 2013, at the Virginia Beach Convention Center during AFCEA’s East: Joint Warfighting event.

Lockheed Martin Awarded Simulation Contract

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Fla., was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract with a maximum value of $146 million. The award will provide for the services in support of the Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability. The Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting activity. 

Marine Corps Ponders Training Changes

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

After a special operations deployment, handling state-of-the-art communications technology tops the list.

Back from a nearly year-long deployment to Afghanistan, the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion already is working to apply lessons learned to training for the next deployment. As the battalion prepares for its next mission, it is reflecting on what its Marines learned about how they train, how their equipment worked and how they will prepare themselves for the future.

While they are able to use some of the best electronic communications gear developed for the military, the Marines nonetheless are trying to learn how they can improve both their initial and follow-up training to get the most out of that equipment. They also are asking important questions about whether they have enough, and the right kinds, of equipment.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 (CWO2) Jason Reed, USMC, is a spectrum operations officer, G-6, and one of the members of the Marine battalion responsible for supporting the communications needs of Marines during the deployment. CWO2 Reed says one of the first things his bosses at the Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) headquarters wanted to know is what worked, what went well and, more importantly, what needed improvement based on the deployment. For CWO2 Reed, that meant one thing: training for combat service support personnel.

He explains that MARSOC recruits Marines who have already received training for more conventional duties. “They’re radio operators, they’re maintenance folks, they’re cryptologists, they’re data network operators,” CWO2 Reed outlines. Upon arrival at MARSOC, however, the Marines receive a new level of training to support Special Operations, getting what he calls “a new baseline” in training.

The U.S. Army Peers 
Into the Future

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

Technology plays a key role in helping the service adapt to a coming decade filled with uncertainty.

U.S. Army futurists believe that events such as last year’s Arab Spring predict a future that includes fighting not only on land but in cyberspace as well. The Army must do it with a renewed emphasis on using technology to empower commanders and their troops during a looming period of significant fiscal restraints.

The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) at Fort Eustis, Virginia, released the U.S. Army Capstone Concept last December, a 34-page document that is an attempt by the service to define its role in the post-Afghan War era and provide a framework for how to fulfill that role. In the foreword, Gen. Robert W. Cone, USA, commanding general of TRADOC, writes that the capstone concept outlines the future operational environment, the role of the Army in the joint American military force and, finally, what capabilities and resources they will need to complete their mission. “Greater speed, quantity and reach of human interaction and increased access to military capabilities make the operational environment more unpredictable and complex, driving the likelihood and consequence of disorder,” Gen. Cone states. As a long-range plan that defines where the Army wants to be in the year 2020, the Army Capstone Concept (ACC) is heavy on context and analysis and leaves details and implementation to constituent commands.

Modeling and Simulation Can Ease Budget Crunch

February 28, 2013
George I. Seffers

As the U.S. government wrestles with its myriad budgetary woes, training, modeling and simulation can provide substantial savings in a variety of ways, according to officials speaking on the Training, Modeling and Simulation panel at the AFCEA Homeland Security Conference in Washington, D.C.

“With the economic turmoil that we find ourselves in today, where we have to simultaneously reduce costs while protecting the homeland, I believe we are now in a period where modeling and simulation and virtual reality methodologies are not really an aid to live training, they are indispensable,” said Sandy Peavy, chief information officer, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Homeland Security Department (DHS).

Peavy reported that her organization is using a modified version of a U.S. Army-developed virtual reality hologram. Since the Army already had invested heavily in the system, the DHS was able to modify it for a modest $1 million, and now the Army is integrating some of the DHS modifications into its own system.

Additionally, David Boyd, who leads the DHS Office of Interoperability and Compatibility, suggested that modeling and simulation can aid the development of FirstNet, a nationwide public safety broadband network that will cost an estimated $7 billion. “We look at modeling and simulation as a way to reduce costs and as a way to look at everything from network scenarios to communications the scenarios,” Boyd said.

He added that there are “a number of issues” with FirstNet, including the fact that it will use LTE protocols, which do not support mission critical voice capabilities and do not meet all of the needs of emergency responses. FirstNet will require the construction of additional towers, an immensely expensive task. “One of the things we have to be able to model is what happens when you overload [the system]. We don’t care what happens on a normal day. We care about what happens when a disaster occurs.”

Lockheed Martin to Provide C130J Trainer

February 22, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training, Orlando, Fla., is being awarded a $20,560,000 contract modification for procurement of one C-130J weapon system trainer device for Air Mobility Command. The contracting activity is the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

The Bottom Line: Fewer Conferences? So What?

February 15, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

The cancellation of several military and government conferences is among the latest collateral damage of financial belt-tightening and looming additional defense budget cuts. But the real question is, “So what?” Read that question carefully. It does not mean, “What does it matter?” but rather “What do global security professionals do now to develop effective networks with the business sector?”

And, those are only two of the important questions raised by the reduction in the number of conferences during a time when cutting costs is crucial. Among the others are:

Professional Development Courses Announced

February 15, 2013

The AFCEA Professional Development Center course schedule for January 2013 to January 2014 is available for viewing and download. Many PDC courses qualify for continuing education units in support of CompTIA certifications: A+, Security+, Network+ and CompTIA Advanced Security Professional. Additional learning formats are now offered, including shorter more focused courses.

Northrop Grumman to Modernize U.S. Army Training Centers

January 11, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
The U.S. Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation has awarded Northrop Grumman Corporation, Herndon, Va., a six-year contract to modernize the existing instrumentation systems at the National Training and the Joint Readiness Training centers. Northrop Grumman will modernize the range data measurement system and observer controller communication system portions of the range communication system at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif. The company also will modernize the observer controller communication system and range data measurement system at the Joint Readiness Training Center in Fort Polk, La.

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