Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

Defense

A Shift in Emphasis Is Underway in the Global Defense Market

January 1, 2014
By Henry S. Kenyon

As European military acquisitions are decreasing, the market in Asia and the Middle East is growing. This transition masks underlying complexities in the international defense market. European nations are shifting from buying tanks and fighter jets to purchasing cyberwarfare and networking equipment while Asian militaries consider maritime surveillance platforms, missile defense systems and power projection capabilities, such as submarines and aircraft carriers.

Global defense markets shrank slightly in 2012 and 2013, mostly because of cutbacks in the United States and Europe, explains Tom Captain, vice chairman and U.S. aerospace and defense leader for Deloitte LLP. U.S. defense spending contracted by 3.3 percent during this period because of a combination of budget cuts and its withdrawal of forces from Iraq and winding down operations in Afghanistan. Large European militaries, such as the United Kingdom and France, also cut their spending. But while defense acquisitions shrank, spending in other sectors, such as Asia and the Middle East, helped to make up for some of this deficit, Captain explains.

Europe’s decline in defense spending is driven by shifting national priorities and external issues such as the European debt crisis. The result has been concern about the need for big-ticket platforms, such as warships and attack aircraft. The nationalized nature of Europe’s defense industries is another factor in the decline. Most European defense firms are partially owned by the government, which leads to additional inefficiency, Captain observes. Consolidation since the end of the Cold War has created major multinational consortia such as Airbus and EADS, he notes, but many small national firms remain. While Europe’s combined defense budgets rival the size of the U.S. defense budget, Captain observes the inefficiencies are causing problems. Issues include job and industry protectionism in the defense sector.

Private Sector Offers Acquisition Alternatives

January 1, 2014
By Rita Boland

Fiscal constraints and technology evolution are forcing the government to re-evaluate procurement efforts with a renewed vigor. Industry has suggestions for improving processes, but progress will require a different level of dialogue between companies and their public-sector clients. Company leaders believe they can help government overcome some of its issues because they understand both realistic technical solutions as well as the effect policies have on acquisition cycles. But they need the opportunity to show what is available.

Army Tests Ground Robots

January 1, 2014
By Henry S. Kenyon

The U.S. Army is looking at the current state of the art in ground robots to revise its requirements for a future unmanned squad support platform. A number of robots were recently evaluated by the service to collect data on their ability to carry supplies, follow infantry over rough terrain and fire weapons in a tactical environment. Army officials say the results of this demonstration will help refine the service’s operational needs and goals before the Army considers launching a procurement program.

Improving Procurement Through Practical Measures

January 1, 2014
By Rita Boland

The U.S. Army is adjusting its Network Integration Evaluations to facilitate acquisitions more rapidly. Calls from industry and soldiers themselves have precipitated the moves. As companies face reduced funding streams, and technology advances in increasingly shorter intervals, implementing briefer time frames between testing and deployment is imperative to remaining viable on and off the field.

Silver Lining Hard to See in Budget Chaos

January 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Historical trends during military drawdowns indicate that current Defense Department budget cuts could last for more than a decade. This situation could endanger major acquisition programs and negatively impact the ability of the United States both to pivot forces to the Asia-Pacific region and to maintain a presence in the Middle East, experts say. But the department may have a short window of opportunity to reconcile strategy with lower budgets.

Q: What are the Legal Pitfalls for Service Members When Using Social Media?

January 1, 2014
By Nicole Woodroffe

Few people go more than a few days without updating their Facebook status, “checking-in” at some location on their social media application or tweeting their opinions on Twitter. Service members are no exception. However, they must take extra precautions to avoid the legal pitfalls of compromising operational security or making inappropriate remarks when posting anything on public websites.

Can You Hear Me, Ivan?

January 1, 2014
By Lt. Gen. Daniel P. Bolger, USA (Ret.)

Bored soldiers often invent ways to pass the time. Out on the wide steppes of Central Asia, the conscript regiments of the old Imperial Russian Army found themselves and their men isolated in hundred-man wooden stockades. Their mission involved border defense, keeping watch for bands of horse brigands who raided by day and for parties of well-armed smugglers who slipped across by night. These furtive foes might appear one day in 300. In the long, dreary, dusty interim, glum Russians practiced marching and marksmanship, cleaned weapons and uniforms and stared out at the endless, flat, grassy horizon.

Raytheon Supports Taiwan Surveillance Radar Upgrade

December 16, 2013

Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Sudbury, Mass., has been awarded a $6,896,385 modification (P0005) on an existing cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price, cost-reimbursement contract (FA8730-13-C-0003) for the Taiwan Surveillance Radar program follow-on support string upgrade engineering change proposal. The contract modification provides a continental United States sustainment string upgrade that creates a controlled site-like testing environment for build deployment and system troubleshooting at the continental United States development facility. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., is the contracting activity.

U.S. Air Force Modifies Boeing GPS IIF Contract

December 16, 2013

The Boeing Co., Seal Beach, Calif., has been awarded a $59,617,404 modification (P00024) on an existing firm-fixed-price contract (FA8807-13-C-0001) for on-orbit support, factory reach-back, maintenance, and storage. This contract provides for exercise of options for additional launch and on-orbit support for GPS IIF space vehicles. The Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center Contracting Directorate, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Continues Radar Support in Afghanistan

December 16, 2013

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Linthicum Heights, Md., was awarded a $65,288,028 contract modification (P00037) to contract W15P7T-11-C-H267 for continued operations and sustainment of the vehicle and dismount exploitation radar (VADER) currently deployed in theater. Work will be performed at Linthicum Heights, Md., Hagerstown, Md., and Afghanistan. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal (Aviation), Ala., is the contracting activity.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Defense