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Defense

U.S. Air Force Awards GPS Systems Engineering and Integration Contract

October 22, 2013
George I. Seffers

The SI Organization Inc., King of Prussia, Pa., was awarded an $83,748,017 multiple-type contract including cost-plus-incentive-fee and firm-fixed-price for systems engineering and integration (SE&I) technical support. This contract provides for SE&I for the GPS Enterprise system of stems that are composed of three product segments that are a space segment, a control segment and a user segment. The Air Force Space and Missile Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif., is the contracting activity (FA8807-14-C-0001).

Missile Defense Agency Awards Support Contract

October 22, 2013
George I. Seffers

Analytical Services Inc., Huntsville, Ala., was awarded a $157,120,496 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. Under this contract, the contractor directly supports all phases of flight and ground testing and is responsible for the development, sustainment and modernization operations of Ballistic Missile Defense System dedicated test data management and data analysis lab infrastructure, test data transfer network connections, distributed operations systems and servers, and other systems. The work will be performed in Huntsville, Ala. The Missile Defense Agency, Huntsville, Ala., is the contracting agency (HQ0147-14-D-0002).

High Technology Comes to Army Vehicle Intercoms

October 10, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Army has begun introduction of a new vehicular intercom system designed to offer soldiers 21st century communications features inside a variety of vehicles. A recent milestone decision by the Army’s program executive officer for enterprise information systems (PEO EIS) gave the go-ahead for procurement of the Army-Navy/Vehicle Inter Communications 5 system, or AN/VIC-5.

The Asia-Pacific Rebalance: Where Does
 It Stand, and What About Implementation?

November 1, 2013
by Kent R. Schneider

It has been less than two years since the president and the secretary of defense released the latest strategic defense guidance, titled, “Sustaining U.S. Global Leadership: Priorities for 21st Century Defense.” A key tenet of this guidance was a strategic rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region. This guidance acknowledged the ongoing threat in the Middle East and South Asia, but it also postulated that the threat capability had been reduced there. It also made the case that, “U.S. economic and security interests are inextricably linked to developments in the arc extending from the Western Pacific and East Asia into the Indian Ocean region and South Asia, creating a mix of evolving challenges and opportunities”—hence the rebalance.

The Failing of Air Force Cyber

November 1, 2013
By 1st Lt. 
Robert M. 
Lee, USAF

The U.S. Air Force cyber community is failing for a single fundamental reason: the community does not exist. In 2010, the communications community began to be identified as the cyber community. An operational cyberspace badge was created, and those who previously had been communications professionals now were seen as cyberwarriors. This change did not effectively take into account that cyber and communications are two distinct fields and should be entirely separate communities.

When attempting to identify cyber operators, it is impossible to look at the cyber Air Force specialty codes (AFSCs) as an indicator. In the officer ranks, only a small fraction ever takes part in on-keyboard or operational missions where the effects of cyber are leveraged for exploitation, attack or defense. Yet, all of the personnel wear the badge and identify themselves, some cynically so, as part of the cybercommunity.

This faux community creates problems when trying to identify the personnel needed for a mission. It is a distinct way of thinking and set of skills that enables an operator to target adversary networks or take an active role in defense. As an example, many people consider themselves computer network defense operators and are consulted as such. Yet, often they participate in more of a communications or maintenance role. They establish, maintain and oversee networks. This is a very important role—maybe even more important than a defense operator’s role when done correctly—but it is different. Applying vendor-issued software patches is not defense; it is maintenance.

Building Highly Functional Teams Requires Empowerment and Trust

November 1, 2013
By Lt. Ben Kohlmann, USN

Over the past year, I’ve had the honor of forming, organizing and implementing two teams of emerging military leaders. Both have provided valuable insights, mostly through learning from doing and adapting after failure. The adage “ask for forgiveness rather than permission” runs deep throughout both, and individual members are given high degrees of autonomy. Working with these two groups, I have learned several lessons along the way, and I hope to carry them forward into the critical second year.

Intelligence Leaders Seek Common Interests With China

November 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Pacific Command intelligence community is fostering an increased dialogue between China and other nations with interests in the Pacific Rim. The expanded effort is designed to build trust, avoid misunderstandings and improve cooperation in areas where China’s national interests converge with the national interests of the United States and others.

U.S. Army
 Pacific Aims 
at Refreshing
 Its Networks

November 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Legacy communications are underpinning new capabilities as the U.S. Army Pacific works to upgrade its systems before obsolescence defeats innovation. The new technologies and systems that will define U.S. military networking are beginning to reach across the Defense Department’s largest theater of operations. Yet, budgetary constraints are hindering implementation of new capabilities, and the existing systems that form the foundation of theater networking badly need upgrades before they begin to give out.

New Tactical
 Computers Offer Battlefield
 Flexibility

November 1, 2013
By Henry S. Kenyon

Warfighters will soon have an easier time accessing and operating battlefield command and control applications from their vehicles, thanks to a new family of tactical computers being issued to Army and Marine Corps forces. The computers will replace multiple pieces of equipment, saving space and power and providing users with better situational awareness by allowing access to a variety of battlefield software applications previously only available to commanders in fixed command centers.

NATO Priorities,
 Post Afghanistan

November 1, 2013
By Rita Boland

People, not technology, are still the greatest advantages or inhibitors in the world of military interoperability. For NATO, bringing together the right humans has enabled amazing advancements during the last five years, but it has also caused confrontations delaying momentum in certain cases.

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