Defense Operations

May 10, 2013
George I. Seffers

 

May 10, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Northrop Grumman Space and Missile Systems Corp., San Diego, Calif., was awarded an $89,425,943 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification that extends the operation and logistics support for Battlefield Airborne Communications Node (BACN) payloads. The contractor shall provide all labor, resources, equipment other direct costs, and travel of contractor personnel for deployment support and operation of the fielded BACN equipped systems. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Mass., is the contracting activity. 
 

May 10, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., Poway, Calif., was awarded a $110,261,703 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft Systems product support and fleet sustainment operations. The total cumulative face value of this contract is $354,683,431. Work will be performed in Afghanistan. The Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity. 

May 10, 2013
George I. Seffers

 

May 9, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Unmanned vehicles may become joint platforms as new software allows operators using a standard control system to use craft employed by different services. So, an Army squad deep in the battlefield may be able to use data accessed directly from a Navy unmanned aerial vehicle to bring an Air Force strike to bear against enemy forces.

May 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Northrop Grumman, Bethpage, N.Y. is being awarded $7 million for ceiling-priced delivery order #7168 under a previously awarded basic ordering agreement for the repair of 13 line items on the advanced electronic attack system used on the EA-18G Growler aircraft. The Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pa., is the contracting activity.
 

May 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

 

May 3, 2013

The U.S. Army is expanding its Range Radar Replacement Program (RRRP) with a high/medium power close-in radar system. The new mobile system will provide fine detail when tracking munitions and other targets at a range of at least 37 miles. The close-in radar system joins the fly-out radar system, the first range instrumentation radar system developed as part of the RRRP. The program aims to help the Army modernize test ranges through cost-effective, digital technologies.

May 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

Boeing Defense, Space & Security, St.

May 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

Logos Technologies Inc., Arlington, Va., was awarded a ceiling $49,750,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to develop and evolve enhanced and advanced techniques and capabilities for efficient collection, advance analytics and analysis of multiple sources of large data stores. Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, N.Y., is the contracting activity. 

May 1, 2013
George I.Seffers

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Corp., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded an $830,000,000 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to contract for additional production of 18 Iraq F-16 aircraft and associated support equipment, technical orders, integrated logistics support, contractor logistics support and an electronic warfare system. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio is the contracting activity. 

May 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Navy and Marine Corps officials describe the K-MAX unmanned cargo helicopter as having met or exceeded requirements in Afghanistan, but they also report that the Marines have not yet developed requirements for the system to become a program of record and say they are unsure what effect sequestration will have on the system.

May 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
NATO has created Sector International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to oversee coalition, command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance efforts in Afghanistan.

NATO has established a new organization in Afghanistan to manage the communications and information systems there in an attempt to revolutionize its approach to those services. The group subsumes operations that used to fall under multiple regional commands, streamlining activities while conserving resources.

May 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Army soldiers from the 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) call in a CH-47 Chinook helicopter for a mission in Bagram, Afghanistan. The 3rd and 4th Brigade Combat Teams will be the first Army units to deploy with Capability Set 13 equipment.

Two brigades from the Army's 10th Mountain Division are preparing to deploy to Afghanistan with a host of technologies that will allow the units to provide their own network down to the tactical edge. The new equipment provides battalion and company commanders with a communications on the move capability and pushes critical data down to the individual squad level.

May 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Joint Network Node (r) and a satellite transportable terminal, part of the U.S. Army’s Warfighter Information Network–Tactical (WIN–T) Increment 1, are set up at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. WIN–T Increment 1 has been fielded to the force, and work on Increment 2 aims to begin deployment this year.

The same approach used to test and implement the Army’s single largest networking system is laying the groundwork for extending the network down to the individual soldier. As laboratory tests and field exercises validate the interoperability of separate elements in a network, system conflicts are giving way to greater commonality among different elements.

May 1, 2013
By Max Cacas
NATO coalition participants in CWIX 2012 man the Land Component Room at the Joint Forces Training Center in Bydgosczc, Poland. The facility will again host CWIX 2013 next month. (NATO Photo)

A military exercise designed to refine and improve the way coalition partners share vital information will, for the first time, include the network that is supporting troops in Afghanistan. Scheduled to take place in Poland next month, the event will feature military command and control communications experts from NATO, partner organizations and nations who share the goal of rigorously testing communications interoperability among coalition members.

May 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
Johns Hopkins University research had demonstrated microdevices that actuate in response to chemicals, but this was not the most practical for defense applications.

U.S. Army researchers have developed micro materials that fold when hit with a low-intensity laser. The advance may eliminate the need for relatively bulky power systems—such as battery packs—on tiny robotic systems. It also could enable robotic microthrusters, unattended ground sensors, or even—theoretically—programmable, easily changeable camouflage patterns.

May 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has lined up the enabling capabilities of its Future Naval Capabilities (FNC) Portfolio for FY14. Almost all the projects include some facet of command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

Opportunities abound for industry to add technical expertise to diverse scientific exploration efforts.

Scientists at the Office of Naval Research are creating the world that will exist half a decade from now through projects that will change the face of the battlefield. With specific programs already decided, officials are turning their attention to garnering the support they need to make their burgeoning technologies a reality.

May 1, 2013
By Max Cacas
Marines at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, assist each other in donning chemical and biological protection suits. Scientists are working to develop new fabrics that will minimize the need for the heavy, uncomfortable suits.

Academic, research and industry teams join forces to improve uniform materials.

May 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
The U.S. Army continues to use its Network Integration Evaluations (NIEs) to examine how technologies work together on the service’s network. Future rounds are scheduled to include more joint and coalition partners to bring in additional perspectives and capabilities.

Moving forward through sequester, next fiscal year's evaluations include new contracts and contacts.

As the U.S. Army prepares its network of the future, it plans to make some changes to the way it approaches working with government and private partners. The moves will increase interoperability downrange while attempting to shorten the ever-frustrating acquisition cycle that keeps the military behind the curve in implementing cutting-edge technologies.

Pages