Defense Operations

April 1, 2013
By Lt. Ben Kohlmann, USN

As conflicts become more complex and uncertain in the 21st century, quick pivots to new technologies will become increasingly important. The starting point for this rapid fielding must begin with more frequent, and more relational, lower level warfighter-technologist interaction.

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
The French defence procurement agency has awarded Thales, Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, a contract to study long-term evolution (LTE) technology standards for mobile telephony. The 10-month technical and operational study will identify the potential capability gains of commercial LTE technology for French land, air and naval forces on domestic and expeditionary operations in collaboration with security forces.

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Simlat Ltd., Herzliya, Israel, was selected to provide an unmanned aerial system (UAS) training center, including its high-fidelity UAS training systems to the Finnish Defence Forces (FDF), as part of the FDF Mini UAS program. The simulation center will support the new Orbiter Mini UAS fleet, which was selected by the FDF last summer as its future UAS. The program includes the manufacturing and delivery of Orbiter Mini UAS, as well as the development of independent operational, training and maintenance capability.

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Linquest Corp., Los Angeles, Calif., is being awarded a $7,002,010 firm-fixed-price contract modification contract for military satellite communication system engineering and integration services. The contracting activity is Space and Missile Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, Calif.  

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Quantum Research International, Huntsville, Ala., and BAE Systems Technology, Solutions and Services Inc., Rockville, Md., were each awarded a $85,500,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modifications to provide research, development, test and evaluation services in support of the Future Warfare Center. The Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., is the contracting activity. 

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Fla., was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract with a maximum value of $146 million. The award will provide for the services in support of the Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability. The Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation, Orlando, Fla., is the contracting activity. 

April 1, 2013
George I. Seffers

 

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

Declining defense funds and the rise of China may hinder strategic rebalancing efforts.

Whatever the threat; wherever the conflict; whatever the mission; the future U.S. military largely will be defined by forced budget constraints. The ongoing fiscal crisis, haunted by the twin specters of sequestration and continuing resolution, will have a greater say in shaping the future force than either adversaries or advances in weapon technologies.

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
A U.S. Army soldier communicates inside his vehicle during the Army's Network Integration Evaluation (NIE) 12.2 in spring 2012.

Force support will change with both stateside relocation and a new way of functioning.

Support to the U.S. Army warfighter’s communications and electronics assets will be taking a new direction as the Army redeploys back to the United States following more than a decade of combat deployments in Southwest Asia. Years of field maintenance will transition to base support, and the many commercial devices incorporated into battlefield operations will require a new approach to service and sustainment.

April 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
The U.S. Army is striving to develop a multifunction electronic warfare, or MFEW, system that will provide a defensive electronic attack capability.

Melding the disciplines of spectrum combat will enable greater flexibility and more capabilities.

The growth in battlefield electronics has spurred a corresponding growth in electronic warfare. In the same manner that innovative technologies have spawned new capabilities, electronic warfare is becoming more complex as planners look to incorporate new systems into the battlespace.

April 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
The U.S. Marine Corps is developing a private cloud computing environment to provide better information services to the tactical edge. Here, communicators set up a Support Wide Area Network System during a training exercise.

As they put the necessary pieces in place, Marines are mindful of tight resources and are seeking help from industry.

For the past year, U.S. Marine Corps technical personnel have been implementing a strategy to develop a private cloud. The initiative supports the vision of the commandant while seeking to offer better services to troops in disadvantaged areas of the battlefield.

April 1, 2013
By Rita Boland
A radio operator for Combat Logistics Battalion-31, 31st Expeditionary Unit (MEU) communicates with the command element during a mass casualty evacuation exercise in Japan.

Looking past the alligators close to the boat, scientists prepare for the wars of tomorrow.

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas
MARSOC Marines, above, prepare to board CH-47 Chinook helicopters as part of a two-day presence patrol with Afghan Commandos in Farah province.

After a special operations deployment, handling state-of-the-art communications technology tops the list.

Back from a nearly year-long deployment to Afghanistan, the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion already is working to apply lessons learned to training for the next deployment. As the battalion prepares for its next mission, it is reflecting on what its Marines learned about how they train, how their equipment worked and how they will prepare themselves for the future.

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas
The 2013 Capstone Concept assumes the U.S. Army will continue to be a land-based force, but one that will adapt to changes in technology and uncertainty in future battlefields.

Technology plays a key role in helping the service adapt to a coming decade filled with uncertainty.

U.S. Army futurists believe that events such as last year’s Arab Spring predict a future that includes fighting not only on land but in cyberspace as well. The Army must do it with a renewed emphasis on using technology to empower commanders and their troops during a looming period of significant fiscal restraints.

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
A modernized and fully digitized unmanned aerial system could be performing vital missions over the Asia-Pacific region in the coming years. The upgraded Shadow system fielded by the U.S. Marine Corps could potentially play a major role in the region.

The upgraded RQ-7 could play a significant role in the Asia-Pacific region.

April 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
Future U.S. Army vehicles may be designed to carry common components that will decrease the size, weight and power consumption of electromagnetic systems while reducing costs and improving interoperability.

An upcoming demonstration could lead to a giant leap in common electromagnetic components.

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers

Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training, Syracuse, N.Y., is being awarded a $17,179,793 modification to previously awarded contract for the procurement of a one year option for fiscal 2013 AN/SQQ-89 anti-submarine warfare engineering services. This includes development and fielding of the AN/SQQ-89A(V)15 advanced capability builds 11 and 13 systems hosted on technical insertion 12 hardware. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers

Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, N.Y., is being awarded a $30,550,000 modification to previously awarded contract to exercise the firm-fixed-price options for the Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program (SEWIP) Block 2 System low-rate initial production units. The SEWIP is an evolutionary acquisition program to upgrade the existing AN/SLQ-32(V) Electronic Warfare System. The SEWIP Block 2 will greatly improve the receiver/antenna group necessary to keep capabilities current with the pace threats and to yield improved system integration.

March 27, 2013
George I. Seffers

Northrop Grumman Corp., Aerospace Systems, San Diego, Calif., is being awarded an estimated $433,518,021 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for contractor logistics support for the RQ-4 Global Hawk fielded weapon system. The contracting activity is the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Ga.

March 26, 2013
By Max Cacas

One of the U.S. Defense Department’s top information technology officials says work is beginning on a multiaward contract for commercial cloud computing services, but the official says he has no timeline or total value for the business.

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