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July 21, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The Department of Veterans Affairs hired a contractor to help veterans who live in rural areas learn to acccess and navigate technical programs that will give them better access to their medical records.

July 8, 2014
By Rachel Lilly

Have you ever walked into a business meeting and wished you could know a bit about each person attending to spark real conversation and bypass the typical small talk? The free Refresh app for iOS provides a quick overview of the people you're about to meet, aggregating information from across the Web.

July 1, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

DARPA is funding a new program to help combat depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and military suicides. It has tools to analyze facial expressions, body gestures and speech, both content and delivery, and inform experts on a user’s psychological state of mind or alert them to behavioral changes that could indicate problems.

June 12, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The White House is going green. Well, more like slate gray. And only on the roof.

July 1, 2014
By Rita Boland
DARPA’s Insight program aims to create an adaptable, integrated intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance system to reduce stovepipes of information and augment intelligence analysts’ capabilities to support time-sensitive operations on the battlefield.

Officials across the U.S. Defense Department are pushing to identify and develop the disruptive technologies that will offer orders-of-magnitude advantages on the battlefield. But while bringing such capabilities to fruition is difficult, even determining what qualifies as disruptive represents a challenge. As personnel wrestle with definitions, they are forging ahead with their creative ideas.

June 11, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Tracking technology developed for the U.S. military might help in saving the lives of firefighters battling wildfires.

June 4, 2014
By Chris LaPoint

Ongoing changes in the tactical networks—the mobile battlefield—should provide the U.S. Cyber Command with an increased ability to discover and address vulnerabilities in these networks.

May 16, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Scientists from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine might have discovered a way to get bodies to regrow muscle following traumatic injuries.

May 9, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

One man’s trash really can be another man’s treasure. Professors at the University of Arizona (UA) recently transformed sulfur waste from refining fossil fuels into moldable, infrared-capable plastic lenses—an incredibly inexpensive and lightweight component that can be used for night-vision goggles among other uses.

The discovery could have huge positive implications for the U.S. military, which has already expressed interest in the patent-pending polymer, Robert A. Norwood, professor of optical sciences at UA, says.

May 7, 2014
By Sandra Jontz
Scientists will use the new capability to study the formation of interstellar grains in the outflow of carbon stars.

NASA scientists at Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, reproduced the processes that occur in the atmosphere of a red giant star and lead to the formation of planet-forming interstellar dust.


May 1, 2014
BY Henry S. Kenyon

The global market for cloud-based architecture and related services and applications is expected to surge through 2017, analysts say. Demand for a variety of virtualized “as a service” capabilities such as infrastructure, software and security also will increase.

April 1, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) remains plagued by decades-old problems of unreliable and vulnerable networks and computer systems, putting the veterans they serve at risk, according to a recent government report. Despite years of documented weaknesses, the VA still has failed to shore up vulnerabilities, according to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) report.

March 31, 2014
By Rita Boland

A new effort hopes to improve relationships between nontraditional performers and government agencies.

December 30, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

The Federal Aviation Administration has announced the six unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) sites available for conducting operations research and testing. Test site operators will perform their research at the University of Alaska; Griffiss International Airport, New York; Texas A&M University; and Virginia Tech, as well as in the states of Nevada and North Dakota.

December 13, 2013
By Jim Sweeney

Every year SIGNAL Magazine introduces a new columnist in the January issue for its Incoming opinion column. Next year’s columnist, Lt. Gen. Daniel P. Bolger, USA (Ret.), picked a timely topic for his first column. He worries that with social media posts, warfighters and civilian military employees “merrily are doing the work of a million foreign spies.” Gen. Bolger warns of a broad trend toward posting too much information in social media.

October 24, 2013
By Rita Boland

Lowest price technically acceptable procurement might not give government the best solutions, and it definitely causes consternation for industry, but it is here to stay at least for a while.

October 3, 2013
By Rita Boland

The latest results in graphene research show promise for improving electronics and biological or chemical sensors by pushing or pulling liquid droplets across the surface. By placing long chemical gradients onto the graphene, scientists can control the substances’ flow.

August 26, 2013
By Rita Boland

Iris scans are a legitimate form of biometric identification over the long term, a new study from the National Institute of Standards and Technology confirms.

April 15, 2013
By Max Cacas

If you have ever called Kent Schneider, president and chief executive officer of AFCEA International, or arranged his attendance at your chapter’s upcoming function, chances are you have either spoken to or interacted with his ebullient executive assistant, Jennifer Argote. Now celebrating two years on the job, Argote is a native of Worcester, a town in the British midlands, and she attended an all-girls secondary school. After what she calls some “technical education,” she went to work for the British Ministry of Defense.

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