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Law Enforcement Technologies

Combating Terrorism with Next-Generation Mesh Networking

October 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Defense Department and interagency special operators are scheduled to begin receiving new tactical mesh networking equipment this month. The kit provides a mobile, ad hoc, self-healing network that offers a full range of situational awareness data, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance feeds, blue force tracking and a voice over Internet protocol capability.

CBP, Maryland Prisons Look to Industry for Cellular Phone Protective Technology

August 21, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Defense contractor giant Lockheed Martin’s LUMEN technology aims to protect cellular phone users from rogue, spoofing systems.

Communications Kit Enables Rapid, On-the-Go Interoperability

September 1, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

A new mobile operations fusion kit that provides easy, rapid and on-the-go interoperability for mobile field operations and communications piqued the interest recently of the U.S. Marine Corps’ research and development community.

Federal Aviation Administration Approves First Unmanned Quadrotor

July 2, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Instant Eye small unmanned aerial system received approval last Thursday from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be used by an energy company, which will conduct research, development and training to see if the system is practical for inspecting infrastructure such as pipelines, power lines and insulators on towers. It is the first unmanned quadrotor to receive FAA certification and may be the lightest aircraft ever certified. The approval opens the door for the system to be used for a wide range of commercial applications.

Slowing Down Rapid Acquisition

August 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers

With the war in Afghanistan winding down, the U.S. Defense Department’s rapid deployment office, which specializes in identifying, developing and quickly fielding game-changing technologies, now will take a more long-term approach. Slightly stretching out the process will offer more flexibility to procure the best possible systems, will present more opportunities for interagency and international cooperation and may cut costs.

U.S. Navy Evaluates Color-Coded Explosive Detection Kits

May 9, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The U.S. Navy has evaluated color-coded chemical detection technology known as colorimetric explosive detection kits, the service recently announced.

Recent Tragedies Illustrate Role of Information Fusion Centers

March 10, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Following the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, government agencies came under widespread criticism for failing to share information and "connect the dots." By contrast, law enforcement agencies were almost universally praised following the Boston Marathon bombing and the shooting at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., both of which took place last year.

Ramping Up the Cyber Criminal Hunt

March 1, 2014
By George I. Seffers

U.S. Secret Service officials are establishing two new cybercrime task forces—in Cincinnati and Denver—that will enhance the agency’s ability to detect and investigate information technology-related crimes, including credit card theft, attacks on the banking and finance infrastructure and identity fraud.

National Security Advances in an Increasingly Connected World

March 1, 2014
By Rita Boland

Homeland security officials are battling privacy and technology issues amid the new social media era that offers both challenges and opportunities. Just as new technologies and information sharing architectures have improved interagency data sharing, new sources of potentially valuable information have emerged to vex planners who must handle technical obstacles and personal rights.

Cyber and Intelligence Need Each Other

July 30, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum Online Show Daily, Day 1

Quote of the Day:

“The more we can talk about cyber and intelligence in the open, the better we will be … the less the demagogues can take it and run with it.”—U.S. Representative Mac Thornberry (R-TX)

Intelligence needs cyber, and cyber needs intelligence. How they can function symbiotically is a less clear-cut issue, with challenges ranging from training to legal policy looming as government officials try to respond to a burgeoning cyber threat.

The cyber threat is growing, and the defense and homeland security communities must strive to keep up with new ways of inflicting damage to governments and businesses. Many experts believe that the cyber threat has supplanted terrorism as the greatest national security issue, and new technologies are only one avenue for blunting the menace. Intelligence must expand its palette to identify and detect cyber threats before they realize their malevolent goals.

Many of these points were discussed in the first day of the two-day AFCEA Global Intelligence Forum, held July 30-31 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Leaders from industry, the military and federal and local government converged in a lively discussion of challenges and their potential resolutions. No single approach reigned supreme among solutions, and the dynamic nature of both the threat and its environment heightened the uncertainty surrounding the future. One prediction that nearly all participants agreed on was that inaction in addressing cyber threats would be catastrophic for the nation as a whole.

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