Marine Corps Technologies

April 2010
By Henry S. Kenyon, SIGNAL Magazine

April 2010
By Henry S. Kenyon, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The hands-free MilTrans Voice Response Translator (VRT) allows U.S. Marines to conduct operations and question locals in 52 different languages. The device has a voice-cued menu that allows warfighters to ask specific questions in the appropriate local dialect.

Commercial kit provides commander with equipment options.

April 2009
By Rita Boland

 
The Marine Corps is testing and evaluating Mojos—power sources that rely on sun and wind rather than fossil fuels. The Marines are testing the systems for use in applications from sensor suites to communications.
Rapid deployment, renewable energy systems could help keep troops safe.

April 2009
By Kathleen Bahr and Maj. Fritz Doran, USMC (Ret.)

April 2009
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Marine sergeant radios other Marines during an operation in Iraq’s Al Anbar province. The Marine Corps is extending network connectivity down to company level and below, and this is posing several techno-logical challenges.
A boost in civilian personnel changes the makeup of the Corps’ networking team.

April 2009
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Marines inside a light armored vehicle engage targets during the first major exercise with the U.S. Marine Corps’ Improved Thermal Sight System. The system is now being fielded in current operations.
Innovative technologies fill immediate needs while military prepares for shift in focus to Afghanistan.

December 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Marine Corps is providing the wireless point-to-point link (WPPL) system to its deployed forces. WPPL features secure point-to-point line-of-sight or non-line-of-sight transmissions for voice, data and video communications.
Mobile transmission equipment provides forces with increased bandwidth, connectivity.

December 2008
By Rita Boland

 
The combat operations center (COC) capability set two shown here is the latest version of the centers. The new version is scheduled for delivery in 2010 and can accommodate 109 personnel. COCs are the cornerstone of future Marine Air Ground Task Force command and control. 
America's elite military branch focuses on standardization and easy integration for management and communications.

May 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A Marine sergeant communicates with his squad on patrol in Haditha, Iraq. U.S. Marine Corps communications and information systems must interoperate throughout mission areas that are more varied than those found at any of the other military services.
Interoperability and jointness benefit, but innovation still is required.

May 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory is using the SpyHawk unmanned aerial system (UAS) as a testbed to study new surveillance and communications technologies. The research is part of an effort to develop a UAS platform to support Marine forces at the echelons between battalion and headquarters.
Unmanned reconnaissance platform allows testing of sensors, datalinks and communications.

April 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

June 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

June 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

September 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Wireless infrastructure, reachback and global connectivity enhance battlefield data flow for front-line units.

The U.S. Marine Corps is moving toward a network-centric warfighting capability that will allow more troops to be placed in the field with a smaller logistics footprint. New communications technologies are aimed at enabling the service to conduct and participate in joint operations with other services and coalition partners with unprecedented levels of coordination and speed.

September 2000
By Christian B. Sheehy

Service continues to evaluate satellite-linked information system for use in amphibious operations.

The U.S. Marine Corps is assessing a new communications system that will enable deployed forces to establish data network connectivity between land and sea forces in support of joint amphibious operations. A combination of commercial off-the-shelf and Marine legacy equipment would provide basic tactical communications designed to meet the requirements of international operations. Currently undergoing a series of tests, the technology could be ready for full-scale implementation as early as fall 2001.

May 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Cunning devices, solutions help Marines fight smarter.

The U.S. Marine Corps is developing battlefield management software and advanced communications tools that will help future commanders make critical decisions by filtering incoming information and suggesting courses of action. This incoming data and the corresponding orders will be broadcast through lightweight satellite communications devices and will reach all echelons from brigade to squad level.

May 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

Open-ended networking platform provides greater flexibility with a smaller footprint.

Tactical network software may enable deployed U.S. Marines to share data about numerous targets without the bandwidth constraints or large space requirements of other systems. As the principles of network-centric warfare continue to drive the development of military command and control doctrine, this central component network could provide answers to the challenges of system extensibility and interoperability.

May 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

Hard-fought lessons learned around the world are changing the way Marines plan to fight in cities.

The U.S. Marine Corps is working a new combined arms team approach to address the challenges posed by fighting in an urban environment. This focus emphasizes training Marines to fight in a new mix of armor and infantry that support each other without sacrificing maneuver warfare capabilities.

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