Guest Blogs

April 12, 2013
By Dr. Louis S. Metzger

The latest Incoming column from Lt. Ben Kohlmann, USN, titled “Link Warfighters to Technologists at the Lowest Possible Level” (SIGNAL Magazine, April 2013), resonated with observations I’ve made and conclusions I’ve reached over the years. I’ve been involved with the research and development and acquisition communities for a long time, including serving as the Air Force chief scientist from 1999 to 2001. Perhaps my adding to Lt.

March 25, 2013
By Michael Carter

The current driving force in the military and defense environment is to keep legacy systems operating longer, or the replacement of legacy systems with new systems that emulate one or more legacy systems with commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology. However, there is insufficient budget to fund development of these COTS systems, and the burden of development falls upon private industry. The current sequestration environment adds another burden on industry to perform to the needs of the military, but without the benefit of nonrecurring engineering (NRE) costs being reimbursed.

March 14, 2013
By Rick Hansen

The Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) Program recently implemented a simplified sign-on capability that enables federal, state and local law enforcement to collaborate.

 

June 11, 2012
By Dan Ward

 The Air Force Chief of Staff had but three critical requirements for the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM): "It should work; it should hit the target; and it should cost under $40,000 each." If only every requirements document could fit on a sticky note!

May 25, 2012
By Jonathan Cisneros

For those who have lost their lives and for the Wounded Warriors that now have long roads to recovery, we owe them the homage and the support they ultimately deserve.

April 11, 2012
By Roger Foster, SIGNAL Scape Guest Blogger

We are drowning in health care data, but remain thirsty for information. Driven by federal incentives, public and private healthcare institutions have generated billions of electronic health records (EHRs), rich with clinical and demographic data. This data can be aggregated and analyzed to improve scientific research, drug safety and overall public health. However, the growth in health care data is so fast that issues surrounding data storage, integrity, modeling and sharing can diminish its tremendous potential. Guest blogger Roger Foster of DRC looks at this important health IT issue.

December 21, 2011
By Dan Barber

From securing the cloud to unwrapping new architecture compliance requirements, 2011 was a busy year for the tech public sector. In the New Year's spirit of renewal and rededication, here are 5 resolutions federal agencies should make.

December 2, 2011
By Prenston Gale

Thousands of data breaches occur as a result of internal information leakage rather than an outside attack. There is a critical need to further educate government personnel on how to keep sensitive information secure. Guest blogger Prenston Gale weighs in with insight on how to achieve this important goal.

September 15, 2011
By Jennifer Miller

"Let's do lunch?" is a phrase many mock; others use it as much as possible to gain invaluable insight from personal experiences and get feedback about present actions and future aspirations. As an intern, I have a limited perspective of the Department of Defense and rely heavily on the guidance of others when contemplating different career ideas, experience opportunities and developmental paths or programs to pursue.

July 25, 2011
By Christine Robinson

We presently are experiencing intense pressure not to raise the debt ceiling, prophecies about the downfall of government IT, more legislators considering reducing the once-sacred defense budget, and prophecies of gloom and doom relating to government programs in general. Despite this, a number of leaders and real change agents both in government and outside government offer us some real hope and shining examples.

July 1, 2011
By Rita Boland

The president and CEO of the USO of Metropolitan Washington encourages everyone to remember our troops and their families as we celebrate our nation's independence.

June 1, 2011
By Christine Robinson

The Air Force and Arlington County, Virginia, are taking preventative measures against hackers such as the ones that recently attacked Sony, costing them over $170 million. It's not just money at risk for government networks, however.

February 16, 2011
By Christine Robinson

Individuals, communities, industry, and governments often neglect to plan for secure normal and contingency operations until a disaster strikes. Rather than planning them separately, why not plan normal operations, physical and cyber security, emergency preparedness and disaster recovery, and integrating renewable energy resources? Military and civilian operations on every level and every nation can benefit both before and after an emergency strikes from adopting industry and government best practices and available technologies available around the world today.

January 10, 2011
By Christine Robinson

Many recognize that our existing organizational and acquisition models can't respond quickly enough to meet the cyber challenge. Why not establish a neutral entity to act as an impartial system integrator that collaborates global efforts and resources to anticipate and defend against our cyber adversaries?

September 17, 2010
By David Trachtenberg

The Military Auxiliary Radio System-MARS-has been a mainstay in military and civilian support communications for decades. Its value as a voluntary civilian entity under the umbrella of the ASD(NII) cannot be understated. But now that the ASD(NII) faces disbanding at the behest of Defense Secretary Gates, what does the future hold? MARS has several potential destinations, but what's the best fit? Where will MARS receive the support it requires to continue flourishing? Share your opinions and ideas here.

September 13, 2010
By planetrussell

Blake Hall is a man on a mission: to help U.S. military personnel use "Web 2.0" Internet technologies to help one another and themselves. Hall's no stranger to demanding missions. A decorated former U.S. Army Captain and Airborne Ranger who led a scout platoon in Iraq, he relates how the first time he ever led a combat mission, his battalion commander laid his hand on his shoulder and said ominously, "Hall, don't screw it up." And based on the overwhelmingly positive, initial response to his and his co-founders' new, veteran-owned web venture, TroopSwap.com, an online community and marketplace for active duty U.S. military, reservists, veterans and their families, that battalion commander would be more than proud.

August 23, 2010
By Paul Strassmann

A different cybersecurity culture needs to be diffused throughout the Defense Department. It will have to view cyberdefenses not as a bandage to be selectively applied to a patchwork of applications. The new cybersecurity must become an inseparable feature of every computer technology that enables our operations.

August 23, 2010
By Paul Strassmann

Defense Department leadership appears to be viewing cyberdefense issues primarily as a matter of policy and strategy that can be fixed incrementally. That is not possible. Cyberdefense deficiencies have became deeply rooted as result of the defective ways in which the Defense Department acquired IT over the past decades. Cyberdefense flaws are inherently enterprise-wide and are mostly not application specific.

July 14, 2010
By Paul Strassmann

Cybersecurity leaks originate from insiders. Unchecked social computing can be the attacker's favorite means for data mining. From the standpoint of our enemies, acquiring easily accessible intelligence from inside sources can be simpler than whatever can be obtained by means of hard work to crack Defense Department barriers.

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