International Security Assistance Force

September 25, 2014

Maj. Gen. William K. Fuller, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff, Operations, International Security Assistance Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Maj. Gen. Jefforey A. Smith, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff, operations, International Security Assistance Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Scott D. Berrier, USA, has been assigned as deputy chief of staff, intelligence, International Security Assistance Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Allan W. Elliott, USAR, has been assigned as the chief, CJ-4, International Security Assistance Force, Afghanistan.

Col. Paul D. Nelson, USAF, has been selected for the rank of brigadier general and assigned deputy to the deputy chief of staff for intelligence, Headquarters International Security Assistance Force and deputy director, operations and support, J-2, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, U.S. Central Command, Kabul, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Laura J. Richardson, USA, has been as assigned deputy chief of staff, communications, Headquarters, International Security Assistance Force, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan. 

Brig. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, USAF, has been selected for the rank of major general and assigned as commander, 9th Air and Space Expeditionary Task Force - Afghanistan; Air Combat Command; deputy commander - Air; U.S. Forces - Afghanistan; and deputy chief of staff - Air, International Security Assistance Force Joint Command, Kabul, Afghanistan.

Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. (USMC), has been assigned commander, International Security Assistance Force, and commander, U.S. Forces–Afghanistan.

June 10, 2011
By Rachel Eisenhower

A U.S. Army team is standardizing counter-improvised explosive device training among coalition partners to improve mission effectiveness and increase collaboration in theater.

April 29, 2010
By Henry Kenyon

Is it possible for the IDC to enable these organizations to work seamlessly once implemented, or will the usual interoperability problems rear their ugly heads? Technology has come a long way, but has it come far enough to eliminate stovepiped systems and overcome cultural differences? Please share you opinions here.