Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

February 2004

Information Technology Needed to Reach The Far Horizon

February 2004
By Capt. Jim Hickerson, USN (Ret.)

With the Pacific Command's area of responsibility covering 51 percent of the Earth's surface, making information technology work to break the distance barrier is essential to the security of the Asia-Pacific region. This fact was emphasized to more than 3,000 attendees throughout AFCEA's TechNet Asia-Pacific 2003 Conference and Exposition. Held November 4-6 in Honolulu, the 18th annual event examined topics such as getting timely information to the correct person; sharing information; information security; policy, strategy, doctrine and organizational transformation; and the government/military/industry team. Senior military speakers and panelists discussed these themes as the requirements necessary to defeat "the tyranny of distance."

What Makes AFCEA Work?

February 2004
By Ray Miller, Regional Vice President, Virginia Region

Being an AFCEAN for many years gives one a unique perspective on what makes AFCEA International so successful. As with any good organization, AFCEA comprises several elements that work well together. And, as for any organization that has continued to thrive over several decades, an examination of AFCEA's successes should help pinpoint areas to make the association as a whole even stronger.

Soldiers Modernize Beneath Northern Lights

February 2004
By Adam Baddeley

The Swedish military is preparing the way for fielding its own soldier modernization program by 2010 with field trials beginning this year. In support of the effort, one company is developing its own soldier ensemble to meet Swedish requirements and to compete in the international market at both the system-of-systems and subsystems levels.
Sweden pursued its own path in defense procurement and development throughout the Cold War, keeping pace with the latest defense technology in military and industrial terms while remaining strictly nonaligned. Industrial consolidation in Sweden with the acquisition of Celsius by Saab, Linkoping, Sweden, was the catalyst for development of the Saab Warrior soldier ensemble.

Health Experts Prepare For Regional Crises

February 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has prepared for a serious health event-including a biological attack-anywhere in the United States by building a multimedia command center in its Washington, D.C., headquarters. This facility serves both to present all the necessary information to a decision maker and to establish vital communications links to emergency responders even during a devastating public health event such as a pandemic or a bioterrorism event.

Center Simulates Homeland Security

February 2004
By Robert K. Ackerman

A commercial homeland security test facility is serving as a proving ground for systems and processes for all levels of government responders. It features hardware and software from dozens of companies as well as potential crisis scenarios developed by government officials.

Virtual Hackers Help Take a Byte Out of Cybercrime

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

Solutions to today's information security challenges may reside in the virtual world. Modeling, simulation and evolutionary computational techniques offer organizations a way to observe how real hackers operate and attack systems. Because tireless computers are doing all the work, data can be gathered around the clock ready for analysts to examine and evaluate.

Information Systems See Red

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

With computer network defense calling for an integrated approach, one government organization is helping public and private enterprises improve their infrastructures by putting them to the test. Armed with research and insight about threats and vulnerabilities, its experts take aim at systems and attack the problem of information security. While playing the bad guy, their mission is to point out weaknesses with the objective of making organizations stronger.

Coalition Interoperability Strategy Comes Home

February 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

After years of searching for interoperability solutions for the multinational environment, this year the U.S. military will focus on how to ensure connectivity at home for coalitions comprising federal, state and local agencies. Using a familiar venue, the U.S. Defense Department will not only examine technical issues but also verify concepts of operations, concepts of employment and tactics, techniques and procedures. Event participants will be geographically dispersed and operationally diverse as they explore how network-centricity can support homeland security and defense.

Regional Effort Forges Emergency Coordination System

February 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has launched an initiative to enhance interoperability between area command centers during an emergency. The effort will create a common communications architecture to enhance participating organizations' situational awareness in a crisis.

Defense Supply System To Out-Maneuver a Flexible Enemy

February 2004
by Henry S. Kenyon

Network-centric warfighting systems are outpacing the U.S. military's logistics systems. This realization, which unnerved millions of Americans as they watched operation Iraqi Freedom unfold on television, has lead to the development of a prototype adaptive response capability for U.S. military logistics operations. The technology consists of a software-agent-based system for tracking and locating supplies to support warfighters. Instead of coordinating the massing of supplies in staging areas and moving them forward, it dynamically tracks units and predicts their needs and allocates the nearest available resources.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - February 2004