Force Transformation

June 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
In support of operation Iraqi Freedom, Seaman Jerry Portillo, USN, monitors the auto tracking management console in the Combat Direction Center aboard the USS John F. Kennedy. Transformational efforts in the U.S. Navy include consolidating some ratings where training and duties overlap.
Knowledge, skills and ability become cornerstone of transformation.

June 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
According to the U.S. Army’s 2005 Posture Statement, soldiers such as Sgt. Tony Blair, USA (l), 940th Military Police (MP) Company, will soon see reinforcements with the addition of 100,000 soldiers moving into high-demand job positions.
Transformation initiative emphasizes unit rotation, modernization and stability.

June 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The U.S. Air Force is counting on the F/A-22 Raptor to perform many of the vital new missions that are emerging from the force transformation that is changing the U.S. military.
Technology and joint interoperation are influencing future capabilities.

August 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Collaboration among government agencies could bring more power to the battlespace.

While the individual armed services continue their march toward change, some forward-thinking military leaders are examining transformation on a larger scale—the realm of operations. Technologies likely to be available in the future will enable effects-based operations, a concept that may not replace conventional warfare but certainly could narrow its breadth.

May 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Increased connectivity shores up power of maritime force.

Military transformation may begin with a vision developed by U.S. Defense Department leaders, but it is in the individual services that the rubber meets the road or—in the U.S. Navy’s case—the keel meets the water. All of the service’s transformation efforts are aimed at achieving specific goals that will make the Navy more agile and increase strike precision.

May 2003
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

Alternative competing concepts, constant debate foster a robust warfighting payoff.

Rewarding unconventional thinking and promoting a culture where people have the freedom and flexibility to take risks and try new things is a salient move by the U.S. Defense Department. In seeking to instill an entrepreneurial approach to developing military capabilities, a key element is to encourage people to behave less like bureaucrats.

May 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Service places processes over hardware for maximum benefits.

The U.S. Air Force is embracing force transformation at the operational and organizational levels and moving away from platform-based modernization. To meet its requirements, the service is selecting new technologies and equipment based on the ability to enhance a variety of capabilities instead of a few narrowly defined missions.

May 2004
By Maryann Lawlor

 

At the Boeing Company’s production facility in St. Louis, the Super Hornet’s forward fuselage, which Boeing manufactures, is spliced together with the center and aft fuselage, which Northrop Grumman manufactures. Boeing is the team lead in the partnership with Northrop Grumman to build the fuselage. General Electric manufactures the engines, and Raytheon provides the radar.

May 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

 

Large numbers of unmanned platforms, such as this Predator unmanned aerial vehicle, will provide future warfighters with around-the-clock persistent surveillance of enemy forces. By providing these systems with datalinks, the U.S. Air Force may be able to create robust mobile networks across entire theaters of operation.

May 2003
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

On-the-move testbed drives speedy battlefield response.

At first glance, Hummer sport utility vehicles, more associated with yuppie urban commandos, would seem unrelated to the U.S. Army’s radical force transformation plans. Nevertheless, in a highly innovative approach, the service bought commercial Hummers, cut them apart, stretched their length, and installed leading-edge communications and information technology systems.

March 2004
By Jeffrey J. Becker

 

Experiment participants collaborate in the U.S. Joint Forces Command's Distributed Continuous Experimentation Environment (DCEE). The DCEE is a dedicated experimentation facility that allows the command to test and evaluate new concepts and prototypes with military personnel worldwide.