Battlefield Information Systems

November 2009
By Rita Boland

 

Weapons Intelligence Team (WIT) 18 destroys improvised explosive device materials it recovered earlier. After WITs complete exploitation of these items, they dispose of the materials by detonation to deny insurgents reuse.

Teams collect explosive device forensics to learn about the people and methods involved.

May 2000
By Lt. Col. James G. O’Donnell, USA (Ret.)

Cost-effective scheme reduces threat to networks while increasing available bandwidth to thirsty users.

Communications specialists are proposing that the U.S. Forces–Korea change engineering and management approaches and follow the lead of commercial Internet service providers. The plan offers wide area network transmission bandwidth between the global defense information infrastructure and command, control, communications, computers and intelligence systems users on the Korean Peninsula, and it addresses several problems with the existing data network there.

May 2000
By Henry S. Kenyon

Using off-the-shelf technology, new system will free signalers for other deployments by end of summer.

British forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo will receive a new, highly automated communications network designed to reduce staffing requirements. Part of an ambitious 28-week program by the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence, it will replace a manpower-intensive system currently in use, allowing roughly 260 Royal Signal Corps personnel to be reassigned. Made entirely from commercial technologies, all elements must be in place and operational by late August before the harsh Balkan winter begins.

May 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Robust collaborative warfighter planning boosts detection, targeting and mobility.

A single secure global information grid is emerging to greatly increase U.S. and allied combat power. This overarching system-of-systems approach recognizes that each unique platform, weapon system, computer, radio, piece of equipment and warrior is also part of a much greater network.

May 2000
By Robert K. Ackerman

Ensuring interoperability on the battlefield may begin in the computer design process, but it is verified in the electronic obstacle course.

The drive to speed new military information system technologies to the field, coupled with an increased reliance on commercial off-the-shelf products, is posing new interoperability problems for communicators. Many of these systems must interoperate in an increasingly networked environment with legacy equipment or foreign counterparts in coalition operations.

March 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

March 2005
By Capt. Erick Stenborg, USA

 
Line-of-sight antennas at Node Center 11, Victory Base in Baghdad, link assets in the mobile subscriber equipment network.

Signaleers meet growing demands for expanded connectivity, additional capabilities.

March 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
UCIM equipment is designed to support tactical command and control operations at the battalion level. It can be mounted in a variety of platforms, including Marine Corps light armored vehicles, high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles and helicopters.

Plug-and-play components can be quickly configured to mission needs.

June 2001
By Robert K. Ackerman

However, interoperability remains a challenge for both joint and coalition operations.

The U.S. military is counting on the information superhighway in its march toward continued battlefield supremacy. As outlined in two recent studies describing future force goals, network-centric warfare is at the core of plans to ensure that military domination is maintained. The aim is for information to be the primary tool enabling U.S. forces to respond to and overcome any military challenge in any arena worldwide.

June 2001
By Maryann Lawlor

Personal digital assistants open windows of opportunity, but not without risk.

Although good things may come in small packages, a handheld device that carries the power of a personal computer raises large information security issues. As more military service members employ cellular telephones, pagers and personal digital assistants to keep track of schedules or to perform duties, their leaders must address the new threats these pocket-sized devices pose in the workplace.

June 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

Innovative devices ready to energize portable systems.

Miniature fuel cells are poised to replace batteries as the power source of choice for handheld communications and electronics equipment. Tests with prototypes indicate that these devices can generate more power, last longer and remain more environmentally friendly than existing batteries.

May 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

Unhindered electron flows clear the way for improved communications and intelligence applications.

High-temperature superconducting materials discovered only 15 years ago now are enabling signal filters that can achieve performance levels not even approached by conventional filters. Virtually any commercial or military system that must pull weak radio frequency signals out of background noise can benefit from the new technology.

May 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

Many questions about the technology remain unanswered.

Researchers are investigating the use of alternative radio transmission methods for military information systems. A recently launched program examines the use of ultrawideband technology in robust, scalable communications devices and networks, in radar and in collision avoidance sensors.

May 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Service moves full speed ahead on transformation.

The U.S. Navy is launching a new initiative that expands the concept of network-centric warfare from the purely technical world to the operations doctrine domain. The paradigm will affect every aspect of the Navy—from acquisition processes to transportation, from information sharing to targeting. Military leaders believe this new approach will increase combat effectiveness and better support joint and coalition operations.

March 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Data fusion, information sharing technologies link allied forces.

Future commanders may benefit from an enhanced situational awareness and battlefield management system that fuses sensor and information feeds to create a coherent picture of an engagement. The system will permit data to be relayed, shared and analyzed by allied joint forces across multiple echelons.

In the past few years, computer and sensor systems have provided leaders with unprecedented amounts of information. Ongoing programs seek to harness this raw data with architectures that outperform and break opposing forces’ decision cycles.

March 2003
By Maryann Lawlor

Futuristic facility helps service direct operations.

By co-locating its intelligence and operations communities under one high-technology roof, the U.S. Marine Corps I Marine Expeditionary Force can now manage multiple missions from a single command center. Systems at the facility allow decision makers to review and analyze information pouring in from tactical network sensors and help the Marines plan and execute military operations, ensure base security and support localized efforts such as fighting forest fires.

March 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Afghanistan proves the worth of total battlefield awareness.

Network-centric warfare proved to be a key enabler for U.S. special operations forces to rout the Taliban in Afghanistan, according to a general in the U.S. Special Operations Command. These forces were empowered by shared situational awareness and robust communications that allowed them to maximize the effects of air and naval support against Taliban positions.

June 2004
By Henry S. Kenyon

Effort allows joint communications, coordination and information  sharing.

U.S. military personnel across all armed services soon may be able to share information quickly with the click of a mouse. A pilot program is using a software-based gateway to connect U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force networks in a single instant messaging system. The program planners seek to enhance communications for training and combat operations.

Pages