April 2005

April 2005
By John J. Garing, Director for Strategic Planning and Information/Chief Information Officer, Defense Information Systems Agency

There are a number of emerging technologies and methods of applying them that will help the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and the U.S. Defense Department as we build the foundation for network-centric operations, two of which are convergence and Web services. DISA is pursuing the acquisition of services and capabilities employing these technologies with techniques such as capacity-on-demand and managed services.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Military and government decision makers convene at the Washington, D.C., Convention Center next month to discuss requirements in current operations and to explore hundreds of technical solutions. TechNet International 2005, which takes place May 17-19, will address the issues that commanders know from experience are real challenges facing warfighters today.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon, Robert K. Ackerman and Maryann Lawlor

As the war on terrorism enters its fourth year, experts offer that the U.S. government can congratulate itself for successfully launching a number of bold initiatives to protect national security.

April 2005
By David L. Fraley Jr.

The convergence of telephone and Internet protocol networks holds great promise, according to industry experts, leading vendors and the press. However, an increasingly converged network also increases the risk factor associated with securing voice and other real-time communication streams. These risks are not limited to Internet-protocol-based networks; traditional time division multiplexing networks also are vulnerable.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

U.S. Joint Forces Command is harnessing the power of extensible markup language to lash together three capabilities and to facilitate collaboration between intelligence and operations activities. If successful, the integrated capability would increase an individual warfighter's ability to control intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance assets and share targeting information, reducing the time between target identification and strike from minutes to seconds. Integration of those capabilities is in the experimental stage, but the project's director is encouraged by the initial results and believes it could eventually lead to humans on instead of in the targeting-strike loop.

April 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

A unique flying antenna testbed plays a significant role in the development and integration of battlefield information networks and communications nodes. Moreover, this aircraft's primary function is to support airborne communications transition to production and fusion into new command and control networks.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Every year, scores of wireless communications products enter the commercial marketplace, but ensuring their security in U.S. government applications remains a major cause for concern for federal authorities. Through the Defense Information Systems Agency and the National Security Agency, the government is creating an architecture as resistant to hacking and other cybercrime as it is secure and efficient for approved users to navigate. A key part of this effort is an accreditation regime that tests and approves all new technologies set to enter civilian government and military programs.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

Focus with flexibility is now the hallmark of the U.S. Defense Department's principal communications capabilities provider. Just 18 months after its third restructuring and in the midst of supporting current operations, the Defense Information Systems Agency is nearing final operational capability of a robust network foundation that will offer warfighters a mega-increase in bandwidth. At the same time, the agency has been meeting immediate needs with new services and scoping out a future that may include modularly designed Web services. These Web services would allow warfighters to harvest the information and intelligence they need from various sources in near-real time.

April 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Army is turning to commercial game technology to teach soldiers how to function like sensors in the network-centric battlespace. An application derived from popular computer-game software is teaching Army personnel how to think, act and respond like intelligence sensors in a network.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

To meet a bold presidential mandate for space exploration, NASA scientists are developing new power and propulsion systems for future generations of manned and unmanned missions. These applications will allow spacecraft to travel efficiently far into the outer solar system, preparing the way for a manned return to the moon and eventually a manned flight to Mars. And new technologies to stay in touch with these distant missions may revolutionize near-earth communications as well.

April 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

Researchers in the long quest for battlefield laser weapons are closing on their objective with the development of a new type of solid-state laser system at a U.S. government laboratory. This laser can be mounted in a small vehicle and can draw from battery power to shoot down difficult-to-hit projectiles such as mortar rounds, or it can be aimed downward to neutralize the threat of buried mines and other explosive devices.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

A new research center is helping scientists to better understand the realm of the very small and to integrate discoveries into existing technologies. Devoted to nonclassified work, the facility is administered by two U.S. national science laboratories and geared toward providing researchers with open access to specialized tools and expertise. Although the main building is still under construction, a number of programs already are underway through special funding.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are crafting the building blocks for future technologies that will increase computing speeds, enhance collaboration and advance the fields of materials science and biology. Today, the facility that produced the first sustained nuclear chain reaction in 1942 continues to develop cutting-edge capabilities through its work with academia and industry. At the same time, it is employing some of the latest technologies to refine its modeling and simulations work that will affect advancements in energy, the environment and national security.

April 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

No one could possibly question the logic of using scarce U.S. Defense Department resources to fully fund the ongoing war on terrorism. If we can spend an extra dollar to prevent one of our military people from being injured in Afghanistan or Iraq, then certainly we should do that.