Federal Laboratories

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

The National Security Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing technologies that could be used in tandem at personnel and vehicle chokepoints. The PNNL’s explosive-detection expertise results in multiple anti-explosives technologies that can be deployed in a range of uses.

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

This image depicts an array of 3 micron (µm) x 3 µm mirrors separated by gaps of ~200 nanometers. At this distance, the Casimir force is not negligible, and it can influence the performance of the devices.

If theory becomes reality, the result could be unprecedented efficiency in military and civilian applications.

June 2010
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Within the next year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers Nickolay Lavrik (left) and Panos Datskos hope to reduce their bench-scale revolutionary chemical/biological sensor to a handheld instrument.

June 2010
By Henry S. Kenyon, SIGNAL Magazine

 

Kevin Pedretti, lead researcher for Sandia National Laboratories’ virtual external operating system program, uses his laptop computer to inspect a virtual machine experiment running on Sandia’s Red Storm super-computer. The goal of the effort is to create a more flexible environment for scientists conducting research on supercomputers.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The ghostly blue glow of electrically charged xenon gas radiates from a 50-kilowatt Hall ion thruster at NASA’s John H. Glenn Research Center. Scientists at the center are developing a variety of electric propulsion systems to efficiently propel spacecraft into the outer solar system.

April 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The Blue Gene system, developed by IBM, has been installed at the ANL and will assist researchers and engineers with computations needed for more detailed simulations.

Computing capabilities to improve the scientific scale of problems tackled by a factor of 100.

April 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) is overseen by the Sandia and Los Alamos national laboratories and the U.S. Department of Energy. Its goal is to provide a multidisciplinary research environment for integrating nanoscience discoveries into practical applications such as microelectronics.

April 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman