April 1999

April 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

The future of tactical military communications with full interoperability may be up in the air.

The Defense Department is striving to link its diverse battlefield communications through a single system based on an airborne platform. This system would be capable of providing connectivity among radio and cellular telephony users while loitering over a theater of operations, and its capabilities could also be applied to intelligence collection and dissemination.

April 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

Interoperability needs, advancing frequency requirements drive latest radio designs.

The advent of increasingly sophisticated threat organizations as well as the need to interoperate with technologically mature militaries are impelling many nations to acquire highly capable communications systems that are available from only a few sources. One system, the PRC2100V Spectre V, is the latest in a series of tactical voice and data communications systems and was designed primarily for use by countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America as well as in emerging markets in Central and Eastern Europe.

April 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman and Michelle L. Hankins

Ashore, at-sea connectivity looms key to fulfilling rapidly changing missions in dynamic environment.

Economic uncertainties, a rapidly changing political picture, and growing regional rivalries complicate U.S. efforts to preserve security in the Pacific region. The world’s largest ocean abutting the most populous continent offers numerous challenges to U.S. forces counted on as the major font of stability in that area.

New information technologies planned for the services loom larger in the context of Asia-Pacific operations. Maintaining a long reach across vast geography is essential to implementing strategic and tactical goals, both political and military.

April 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Developers offer specialized systems for law enforcement that provide increased capabilities in evidence collection.

New data collection technology can provide a virtual image of a crime scene to give a visual representation of the scenario in criminal cases. This technology, which uses a pen-based computer, is being developed with input from law enforcement communities to help investigators and officers in the field.

April 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

Comprehensive police database management system aids and abets investigators and administrators.

Field operatives can share the capabilities of their headquarters counterparts to access and cross-reference law enforcement data from large archives or active files. Software capable of running on commercial off-the-shelf hardware allows collection and dissemination of vital police information from diverse sources without overwhelming its user.

April 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

New missions and rapidly evolving commercial technologies lead to widespread doctrine changes, ease enlargement tasks.

The need to extend operations beyond conventional alliance borders is driving technology development in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. The alliance is embracing digital technologies to pave the way for its new command and control infrastructure, which must be flexible enough for a variety of potential missions.

April 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

The former Warsaw Pact nation is embracing Western methodologies as it seeks to join the Atlantic alliance.

The Republic of Bulgaria is tapping the North Atlantic Treaty Organization for ideas, tactics and technologies as it restructures its military to serve European security needs in the coming century. The goal of this effort is to be a functional European security partner as a full member of the Atlantic alliance, and at the center of the thrust is development of a robust command, control, communications and computers infrastructure.

April 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Radars and command and control systems emerge from studies of advanced electronics, microwaves.

A Warsaw institute that predates World War II is focusing its efforts on providing Poland with advanced technological know-how to smooth the country’s entry into the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Known as the Telecommunications Research Institute, the group of scientists and engineers is building on decades of military electronics development to supply Poland’s military with radars and related components that will interoperate with their counterparts among the country’s new Western allies.

April 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

Growing variety of services meets the challenge of orbital networking.

The plethora of satellite communications options now available to ground-based users has induced one company to offer its customers a wide range of products and capabilities. This market-driven strategy addresses a growing trend in which satellite users face an expanding and confusing variety of services and providers.

April 1999
By Dr. Javier Solana

A successful 50 years of maintaining security spawns a new relationship among European and North American nations.

April 1999
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Dangerous theater competitors in Asian flash points engender increasing threat environment instabilities.

Sails billowing from strong economic, technology and military winds, the U.S. ship of state is tacking toward the future, seeking to shape its own strategic environment. Dead ahead in Asian waters, however, are ominous heavy weather and treacherous shoals. The U.S. military and its allies are facing a growing number of hostile rogue states that are equipping themselves with dangerous technologies designed to thwart power projection.

April 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Telecommunications giant builds network to integrate voice, data and video capabilities.

April 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Telecommunications firm extends connectivity to rural communities, federal agencies and military facilities.

April 1999
By Lt. Gen. C. Norman Wood, USAF (Ret.)

This month, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) celebrates its 50th anniversary. In addition to preserving peace and freedom for members on three continents, NATO’s strength and resolve contributed to the collapse and dissolution of its adversary. With the alliance’s original task accomplished, NATO now stands on the cusp of a new era where its primary mission can be to extend freedom to those long denied.