May 2005

May 2005
By Michael Pflueger, Chief Information Officer, Defense Intelligence Agency

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

As asymmetric threats to the United States continue to increase in number and expand in complexity, the protection of critical U.S. Intelligence Community and Defense Department information systems is a vital concern for the DIA. In consonance with the vision set forth by Vice Adm. Lowell E. Jacoby, USN, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) director, the DIA will have a major role in ensuring that intelligence information is successfully and securely communicated to the warfighter and to decision makers.

May 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The goal of the Digital Army Program (DAP) is to develop a system of systems that would connect all echelons of the Israeli army. Tactical units such as this armored fighting vehicle will use a wireless backbone to share voice, video and data.
New system offers increased situational awareness through sensor fusion and battle management tools.

May 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman and Beverly P. Mowery

 
Vice Adm. Arthur K. Cebrowski, USN (Ret.), outgoing director of the Office of Force Transformation, gives the Kickoff Address at West 2005.
Much remains on the plate for post-Iraq military transformation.

May 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

Chairman envisions the market remaining robust, predicts more mergers.

If throughout your entire professional life you had gone by a nickname associated with one of the towering giants of American literature, what would you do when you finally retired from the corporate world?

Why, write a book of course. So it will be with J. Phillip London, who got the nickname “Jack” while attending the U.S. Naval Academy in the late 1950s. The original Jack London was the writer famous for his wilderness stories such as The Call of the Wild and To Build a Fire.

May 2005
By Cheryl Lilie

 
Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) researchers (l-r) Dr. Iulica Zana, David Arnold and Dr. Jin-Woo Park work with a dime-size generator they developed that can produce enough power to run a cellular telephone. The generator will be incorporated into a microengine that will power military electronics.
Mini device proves powerful enough to run military electronics.

May 2005
By Capt. James Lowery, USMC, and Capt. Jillian Klug, USA

May 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Members of the Canadian Communication Reserve prepare to begin a reconnaissance mission to find new locations or radio detachments and to lay telephone lines to the locations.
Changes in structure and training ensure seamless integration with regular force.

May 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A low-profile organization looks far ahead into an esoteric world.

May 2005
By Capt. John S. Transue, USA

 
Staff Sgt. Terrance Toppin, USA (l), cable section supervisor, and Sgt. 1st Class Demetrial Houston, USA, cable platoon sergeant, both with the 13th Signal Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division, check the conduit system near Camp Liberty before engineers backfill the trenches.
13th Signal Battalion delivers familiar tools to combat environment.

May 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

May 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Army officer uses a Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below, or FBCB2, system. U.S. Defense Department planners are striving to ensure that data inherent in this and other position location displays can be shared with similar systems across service lines.
The key is to allow users to view different data their own way.

May 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The Office of Naval Research funds a number of programs at universities, military commands and small businesses that are examining how members of a decision-making team manage information, add personal knowledge and collaborate to create tactics.
Military, industry and academia lay the groundwork for effective knowledge management tool designs.

May 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The network-centric Free World is placing a greater emphasis on intelligence than ever before—both for battlespace military operations and for winning the war on terrorism. However, while much attention has been focused on intelligence collection, processing and dissemination, it is knowledge management that will win or lose conflicts in the future.

May 2005
By Robert K.Ackerman

 
A U.S. Marine F/A-18 Hornet catapults from the deck of the USS Harry S Truman in support of ongoing operations in Iraq. The office of the J-6, the Joint Staff, gives top priority to support of U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The list of requirements is long and the margin for error is small in wartime.