Search:  

 Blog     e-Newsletter       Resource Library      Directories      Webinars
AFCEA logo
 

February 1999

Superconductor Advances Expand Signal Reconnaissance Capabilities

February 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

Highly refined signal filters will open new vistas in applications ranging from complex intelligence gathering to cellular telephony. The advances emerge from high-temperature superconducting materials incorporated into semiconductor chips. Researchers at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency have moved some aspects of this technology to the private sector for production and commercialization.

China Forges Ahead With Indigenous Avionics Base

February 1999
By James C. Bussert

The People's Republic of China is grappling with an inherent conflict of relying on imported avionics technology while pressing to develop a state-of-the-art domestic manufacturing base. The country continues its long-term commitment to advanced avionics research and development both for internal use and for export, and foreign technology is one source feeding that endeavor.

Israel Designs Antiarmor Missile To Fire Out of Tank Guns

February 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

Israel is developing a laser-guided antitank/antihelicopter missile that will be fired out of tank guns instead of from missile launchers. In its antihelicopter role, the missile would enable tanks to defend themselves against fast-moving helicopters that can fire antitank missiles from beyond the effective range of conventional tank gun projectiles or onboard machine guns.

Universities Respond to Growing Demand With Custom-Designed Technology Programs

February 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

The rapid advancement of technology is causing continuous change in academic institutions tasked with preparing the work force of the next century. An incessant and increasing need for technically proficient personnel has placed a burden on institutions of higher education, demanding that they produce employees who can handle information technology systems that now permeate virtually every aspect of the business world.

High-Level Graphics Computing Migrates to Desktop Machines

February 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

A series of desktop central processing units combines the attributes of workstations and personal computers into a single platform. The new hardware can bring detailed imagery and graphics manipulation into the hands of more users throughout government and the military at prices comparable to those of mid-level personal computers.

Diversity and Information Technology Provide Stability, Promote Success

February 1999
By Michael A. Robinson

You could forgive Bob Beyster for looking on his company with dollar signs in his eyes. After all, the chief executive officer of a nearly $5 billion global technology empire expects it to double in size again in the next five years.

Multilevel Security Solutions Advance for Operating Systems

February 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

The information technology industry is increasingly directing its efforts to commercial security requirements and less so to those of government. The result is that the private sector is overtaking its government counterpart in maintaining computer network security.

Electronic Commerce Stimulates Total Network Security Approach

February 1999
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Protecting electronic commerce on the Internet is a very secretive and unforgiving business. Robust security, however, is pivotal to its phenomenal expansion as networks surge toward a $200 billion market within the next two years. This demand for vigorous network refuge is creating a $6 billion worldwide security industry market, growing at a rate of more than 50 percent a year.

Industry, Government Team To Move Masses of Tax Data

February 1999
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Internal Revenue Service is adopting a mission-oriented approach to designing its new agencywide information infrastructure. Instead of focusing on information technology, the modernized system will be business-centered to ensure that it directly addresses the agency's requirement to manage mountains of data while collecting over $1 trillion in annual tax revenues.

Commercial Software Offers Storage, Retrieval Solutions to Federal Agencies

February 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

Federal agencies with specialized image archival requirements are meeting their storage and retrieval needs by maximizing the capabilities of software first used by Hollywood's entertainment industry. Government organizations with large image databases can use this software, which employs innovative search techniques, to help analysts sift through incalculable amounts of digital information. The software eliminates typical problems involved in tracking important reference material and can assist agencies by also housing information gathered from analysis of image files.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - February 1999