June 2005

June 2005
By Col. William Tyndall, USA, and Lt. Col. Tim Mishkofski, USA, (Ret.)

June 2005
By James C. Bussert

Exercises to rapidly deploy or preposition U.S. minesweepers to Taiwan could deter such activity.

The People’s Republic of China is building the necessary infrastructure to mine the ports of Taiwan should military conflict break out between the two governments. This capability would give China an effective blockade ability without the risk of escalation that would emerge from a direct military confrontation with the United States.

June 2005
By SIGNAL Staff

 
Thomas W. O’Connell, assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conflict, gives a keynote address at TechNet Tampa 2005.
Network-centric operations just one aspect of combating terror worldwide.

June 2005
By Maj. Gen. Dale W. Meyerrose, USAF, Chief Information Officer, North American Aerospace Defense Command and U.S. Northern Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

This is an interesting question, and if I truly knew the answer, I would be very rich and powerful. However, I am not any better at predicting the future than anyone else. Yet I find this to be a useful intellectual exercise as the alternative leaves us substituting hope for strategy, chaos management for a campaign plan and damage control for daily activity.

June 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

June 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A Boeing Delta IV, the U.S. Air Force’s newest heavy-lift launch vehicle, blasts off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Once the realm of only a handful of nations, space access is opening up to many other nations, which promises to erode U.S. superiority in that arena.
America’s near-monopoly on intelligence and other satellite capabilities is coming to an end.

June 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

June 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

June 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

June 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
In support of operation Iraqi Freedom, Seaman Jerry Portillo, USN, monitors the auto tracking management console in the Combat Direction Center aboard the USS John F. Kennedy. Transformational efforts in the U.S. Navy include consolidating some ratings where training and duties overlap.
Knowledge, skills and ability become cornerstone of transformation.

June 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
According to the U.S. Army’s 2005 Posture Statement, soldiers such as Sgt. Tony Blair, USA (l), 940th Military Police (MP) Company, will soon see reinforcements with the addition of 100,000 soldiers moving into high-demand job positions.
Transformation initiative emphasizes unit rotation, modernization and stability.

June 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The U.S. Air Force is counting on the F/A-22 Raptor to perform many of the vital new missions that are emerging from the force transformation that is changing the U.S. military.
Technology and joint interoperation are influencing future capabilities.

June 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

When people look at the ongoing force transformation, they probably see investments in technology changing the way that the military services are equipped. The goal is for the military to be better prepared to fight the nation’s wars in the foreseeable future. This visage might translate to lighter, more agile forces; a more ground-centric military; or more automated and unmanned platforms—depending on the viewer’s perspective.