July 2005

July 2005
By Michael A. Robinson

An ambitious company president pushes to double his firm’s U.S. federal business.

If his eyesight had not failed him, Scott Dixon Smith might never have embarked on a career in technology, let alone one supplying visualization software to corporations and federal agencies. In fact, even before he entered college on a tennis scholarship, Smith already had charted a completely different course.

July 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The topographic data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) allows the U.S. government to generate altitude maps for 80 percent of the Earth’s surface.
Space-based radar topography allows development of advanced guidance, tracking software.

July 2005
By Donald Schroeder, Chief Information Officer, Sandia National Laboratories

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

The emerging technology that will have the greatest impact on Sandia National Laboratories, a National Nuclear Security Administration lab, reflects the shift toward an increased reliance on supercomputers and their validated numerical simulations to model the nuclear stockpile. Computer simulations will revolutionize the laboratories’ microelectronic and nanoscale contributions to engineering and national security. Simulations help researchers work faster and more accurately.

July 2005
By James C. Bussert

 
China’s new DDG 170 guided missile destroyer features Aegis-type phased array antennas and a ship-to-ship missile control Bandstand radome dominating the bridge. The ship’s numerous foreign weapons and new radomes hint at the complexity of its electronic functions.
A coastal force extends its reach and capabilities.

July 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The command center of the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), is the fusion center for data from other centers within the command. Portal technology will improve information sharing among personnel at NORAD, the U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), other combatant commands and Canada
Decision makers can let their fingers do the talking.

July 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Art and science combine to create a representation of a desktop-scale molecular manufacturing appliance. As envisioned, tiny machines would join molecules then larger and larger parts in a convergent assembly process that makes products such as computers with a billion processors.
Nanotechnology could lead to next arms race; experts debate how to prepare.

July 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
This microscopic mirror lies at the heart of many nanotechnology-driven devices. These mirrors can tilt in various directions to steer light to act as optical switches for information in the form of photons.
Longtime telecommunications scientists join forces with academia to push the state of the art.

July 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The porphyrin nanotubes developed by Sandia National Laboratory researchers John Shelnutt (l) and Zhongchun Wang use light to assemble themselves. These structures have a variety of potential applications in electronics, fuel cells and optics.
Photo-activated porphyrin nanotubes offer potential energy, manufacturing solutions.

July 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Editor’s Note: This is a revised version of the article that appeared in the July 2005 issue of SIGNAL.

July 2005
By Clarence A. Robinson Jr.

 
One of three Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) communications satellites operating in geosynchronous orbit is depicted in an artist’s concept. Note the hexagonal gold patches on the earth-pointing deck that houses electronic phase shifters for agile phased array antennas.
Orbiting digital switchboard responds directly to combat signals using onboard processors.

July 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Col. Richard Hansen, USA, demonstrates the Force XXI Battle Command Brigade and Below (FBCB2) commander’s digital assistant (CDA). This device brings vital situational awareness information to individuals and allows them to provide intelligence data to the FBCB2 network.
The two-way information highway extends closer to the soldier.

July 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

July 2005
By Cmdr. Henry Johnson, USNR (Ret.), AFCEA San Diego Chapter President