August 2005

August 2005
By Maryann Lawlor, Jeff Hawk and Henry S. Kenyon

August 2005
By Brig. Gen. (Sel.) David B. Warner, USAF, Acting Chief Information Officer, U.S. Joint Forces Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

August 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Rear Adm. Thomas E. Zelibor, USN, is the director of global operations, U.S. Strategic Command.
Network-centric operations call for balance between sharing and protecting information.

August 2005
By Cmdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

 
Gen. Rainer Schuwirth, GEAR, chief of staff, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, questioned why it is so difficult for military communications to achieve the same levels of affordable interoperability that commercial companies offer their mobile telephone users.
Transformation, interoperability and standardization are benchmarks for change, they say.

August 2005
By Martin E. Mendoza and Kelly Straub

 
11th Signal Brigade soldiers transmit test messages via their data package at Defense Department Interoperability Communications Exercise 2005. A typical data test involves approximately 5,000 images, e-mail messages, file transfers and Web server requests.
Greater use of commercial technologies does not guarantee military success.

August 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

August 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
David Wennergren, chief information officer for the Navy, tells success stories to Transformation TechNet 2005 attendees.
Visionary optimism meets pragmatic reality at Transformation TechNet 2005.

August 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
Web-equipped warriors will have the ability to report and retrieve updated field information via a personal handheld device if the Joint Battle Command Bridge passes an Army test slated for late next year.
Experiment tests new system to connect today’s platforms to tomorrow’s networks.

August 2005
By Cheryl Lilie

 
The U.S. Joint Forces Command Joint Experimentation Directorate, developed, modified and installed an information-sharing portal for Multi-National Force–Iraq in Baghdad in less than a year.
Disparate people, data come together through Web tool.

August 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

August 2005
By Jeff Hawk

Defense agency’s new approach avoids playing into the adversary’s hand.

August 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The U.S. Army Network Operations and Security Center (ANOSC) is co-located with the Army Computer Emergency Response Team (ACERT) to help ensure network security. Also located in the Fort Belvoir, Virginia, facility are task force operations and computer network operations intelligence.
Keeping ahead of cyberfoes remains the key to protecting information technology assets.

August 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
U.S. Army soldiers use SecNet 11 to send link-encrypted communications.
Modular Internet protocol-based encryption technology enables wireless transmission of Top Secret information.

August 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

There should be no debate over the need for effective information security in the information revolution. As digital information becomes more vital with the growth of cyberspace, securing it increases in importance. However, even with broad public awareness of the need for cybersecurity, the infosphere is faced with a serious challenge that is multifaceted and that defies easy solution.

For example, recently my wife’s computer rebelled and refused to cooperate. As the machine’s functions deteriorated and my wife’s frustrations grew, she declared that if the cause were another virus, then she would give up going online and would cede cyberspace to the bad guys.

August 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Operations Spc. 2nd Class Michael Cacese, USN, tracks contacts on a screen in the combined intelligence center aboard the USS Bulkeley. Merging intelligence information from several sources poses challenges to information assurance for the military.
Metrics and training initiatives prepare military to move safely to network-centric environment.