December 2006

December 2006
By Brian Reily, Chief Information Officer, Office of Naval Research

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

Without a doubt, service-oriented architecture (SOA) and specifically the impact it will have on how personnel think about and deploy business services will affect the way the Office of Naval Research (ONR) does business. As others have stated in this column, the biggest challenge will be the processes and thinking that must be put in place to make the technology work.

December 2006
By Col. David De Vries, USA; Lt. Col. Charles Wells, USA; and Lt. Col. Dana Steven Tankins, USA

 
Spc. Damian Fugate, USA, and Spc. Matthew Evans, USA, adjust a Phoenix satellite system dish on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan.
Bandwidth increase serves as precursor to the modern communications battlefield by supporting the deployment of new concepts and equipment.

December 2006
By Rita Boland

 
Tom Brokaw, former anchor and managing editor of NBC Nightly News, called for renewed patriotism
at MILCOM 2006.
U.S. military and government leaders seek partnership with industry in communications.

December 2006
By Cdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

New and effective technologies will be essential for NATO to carry out missions beyond its traditional areas of responsibility. Industry is a key player in providing needed capabilities, and ongoing cooperative efforts between the Atlantic alliance and its commercial partners need to be enhanced and their procedures improved.

December 2006
By Capt. Dave Munichiello, USAF

 
The everything over Internet protocol (EoIP) solution promises improved efficiency while supporting more end users than legacy equipment. The circuit-based telephony setup requires 238 more cubic feet and six more people than EoIP architecture.
Size, weight, cost and personnel concerns amplify demand for communications system built on flexible framework.

December 2006
By Rita Boland

 
The Cell Broadband Engine, or Cell processor, developed by IBM Corporation, Sony Group and Toshiba Corporation, combines eight processors on a single computer chip.
Innovative microprocessor needs less space to produce more power.

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

December 2006
By Rita Boland

December 2006
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Synthetic Aperture Ladar for Tactical Imaging (SALTI) program is studying practical applications for synthetic aperture ladar (SAL) technology. Unlike synthetic aperture radar, which requires trained personnel to interpret data, SAL can produce photo-realistic images.
Airborne light-based system delivers more detail, high data rates.

December 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Two U.S. Navy intelligence specialists identify and track surface contacts from aboard the USS Wasp. Navy intelligence increasingly will be providing vital information on maritime domain awareness to foreign navies as part of the Navy’s effort to identify global patterns or threats.
Keeping the Navy informed will require collaborative culture and technologies.

December 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

December 2006
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
The USS Princeton and the USS Nimitz lead a collection of U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard ships. The Navy is restructuring to interoperate with a host of ships from outside of its fleet, including those of foreign navies, as it addresses a range of new missions worldwide.
Network centricity lags as the sea service strives for greater versatility.

December 2006
By Rita Boland

December 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The new alignment of responsibilities at the Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM) will enhance the service’s command and control abilities, increase maritime security and facilitate seamless communication.
Blending capabilities arms component commanders with additional intelligence.

December 2006
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The U.S. Navy, master of the seas and leader in net centricity, faces an uncertain future in the very information technology applications it has led for years. If the Navy does not change its personnel system and its education system, then it will be a Navy that can maintain only information tools that are developed elsewhere and modified to fit the maritime role. Without a change in direction, our Navy will not be able to build and support the tools designed to serve the maritime warfighter from requirements development to acquisition.