February 2007

February 2007
By Rita Boland

 
The military is determining ways to reduce its dependence on foreign oil by developing alternative energy sources. The United States gets much
of its energy from unstable regions
of the world.
U.S. military branches can lead the way in conservation practices and alternative technologies.

February 2007
By Rita Boland

Personnel will concentrate on technologies with broad uses.

To focus on technologies that have global- or theaterwide effect and that span the branches of the U.S. military, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has combined its Advanced Technology Office and Special Projects Office to form the Strategic Technology Office. The office is determining what capabilities warfighters lack and finding solutions for current problems and potential needs.

February 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Michael Chertoff, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (c), and other federal officials are briefed on the U.S. Army’s rapid deployment of mobile communications systems. Systems such as ISE could help resolve some of the information-sharing problems that government agencies experience.
Information owners control who sees what, how and where.

February 2007
By Allan D. Kissam

 
The command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) Mobile Application Server (CMAS) emulates a C4I network. CMAS allows users such as John Olson (c); Cpl. Andrew Reiplinger, USMC (l); and Cpl. Eric Holcomb, USMC, to hone their skills with one stand-alone package.
Mobile application server delivers realistic, operational training to deployed troops.

February 2007
By Cmdr. Gregory E. Glaros, USN (Ret.)

Enabling collaboration and interoperability depends on complex social issues.

February 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

February 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

Similar challenges afflict both, but communication shortcomings limit joint endeavors.

Despite common interests and goals, the military and the information technology sector are hampered by cultural differences that thwart their ability to work together, according to a former U.S. Defense Department information technology leader now in the private sector.

February 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
 
The U.S. Army Rapid Equipping Force is testing Transportable Hybrid Electric Power System units, or THEPS, for possible deployment to Iraq. These units generate power from renewable sources such as wind and solar power.
The department thinks globally, acts globally.

February 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

February 2007
By Col. James P. Kohlmann, USA, and Col. Keith H. Snook, USA (Ret.)

 
Typical communications infrastructure destruction caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita led the U.S. Defense Department and the U.S. Northern Command to deploy military communications systems to the region.
Numerous interoperability efforts are underway, but an overarching, unifying concept is missing.

February 2006
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

A former boss used to remind all of us, “Security is like oxygen. You never think about it until you don’t have it. And when you don’t have it, you don’t think about anything else.” But this brings to mind the question, security of what?

 

Many people think of homeland security in terms of physical entities—infrastructure elements such as railroads, power grids or even the World Wide Web. But in fact, the centerpiece of any security system is people. We safeguard physical plants to provide effective security for the people they serve, not just to preserve hardware.

February 2007
By Stephen C. Barrett

 
Frank Suraci, technical director for the National Communications System’s (NCS’) Government Emergency Telecommunications Service (GETS), tests videoconferencing equipment for priority communications. The test was part of a 12-day interoperability exercise involving four countries.
International tests demonstrate priority telecommunications and global interoperability.