March 2007

March 2007
By Cmdr. Gregory E. Glaros, USN (Ret.)

There was never a technology they didn’t like … at a cost they could afford.

March 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

New photovoltaic technology promises embedded power for handheld systems.

Warfighters soon may turn to the sun to recharge their battlefield electronics. The U.S government is developing highly efficient solar cells that will be built into batteries and tactical equipment such as night vision goggles, personal navigation devices and radios. The effort seeks to cut the number of spare batteries carried by soldiers to save weight and reduce logistics requirements.

March 2007
By Rita Boland

March 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

Editor's Note: Since the publication of this article Intevia has been acquired by its partner company Telezygology Incorporated (tzinc.com).

March 2007
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The U.S. Army’s Electronic Data Manager enables members of an aircrew to plan missions and react to mission changes in flight. These devices require power sources that are lightweight and long lasting. More than 1,000 of the systems have been fielded in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Service searches for longer lasting, lightweight batteries to energize the force.

March 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A Proteus testbed aircraft carries the Global Hawk variant of the U.S. Air Force’s new multiplatform radar technology insertion program radar. The Electronic Systems Center (ESC) program will equip the unmanned aerial vehicle as well as other platforms with a radar that can feed data into the Air Force’s Airborne Network.
Diverse electronics systems find common ground.

March 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Scientists at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory test a composite radar antenna that can serve as the skin of an aircraft. Breakthroughs in low- and high-band radar antenna technology are clearing the way for aircraft exteriors built largely of sensors.
Radar advances clear the way for long-duration sensor aircraft.

March 2007
By Michael A. Robinson

A series of acquisitions fills in the franchise.

Running a key sector in one of the world’s largest information technology companies may not seem to have much in common with automobile repair. But one corporate leader draws from that discipline to drive a group that has undergone a complete overhaul since a serious breakdown little more than a decade ago.

As a high school junior in her native Arlington, Virginia, Anne K. Altman bought a 1968 AMX, something of a muscle car that was the first steel-bodied, two-seat American sports vehicle since the famous 1957 Ford Thunderbird.

March 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Human behavior modeling can result in digital characters such as the ones in simulations and video games or in charts, graphs and reports that predict and explain actions. Accurately modeling humans is a difficult task because of the variables involved.
Developers strive to create accurate portrayals of behavior, believe breakthroughs loom.

March 2007
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle equipped with targeting pods flies over Southwest Asia. The Air Force will be integrating nontraditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) from platforms such as these to a greater extent, but the way to accomplish this effectively is not yet clear.
Consolidation centralizes capability development.

March 2007
By Rita Boland

 
Simulation developers at the Army Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation are working on tools that soldiers can use from any location. Some simulations will allow soldiers to practice working in teams through networked computers.
Program office is making training more available and interoperable.

March 2007
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

After five and a half years in which you have entrusted in me a leadership position at AFCEA International, it is now time for me to step down as president and chief executive officer.

These years have been eventful ones replete with challenges and opportunities. I assumed the helm of AFCEA less than three weeks after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. That 21st century Day of Infamy changed the world forever, and our association and its members found themselves in the thick of the activities that followed.

March 2007
By Maryann Lawlor