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December 2007

User Awareness Can Prevent Icy Surroundings

December 2007

Many threats you can recognize instantly. For example, the drunk driver careening towards you, the group of armed men forming on a nearby rooftop, a snarling dog with its ears back or your sister-in-law and her eight kids pulling into your driveway. Well, maybe the in-law and her brood are not really threats, but at least you can see them coming. Cyber threats are more insidious. They can surprise you like high blood pressure or a spot inspection.

A Navy of One

December 2007
By Cmdr. Gregory E. Glaros, USN (Ret.)

Between 1870 and 1871, the European continent experienced the Franco-Prussian War, which gave no warning of what World War I would be like. But this “quaint” war did foreshadow the importance of logistics, the need for reliable lines of communication and the effect of rapid innovation on the battlefield.

Technology Transforms NATO Forces

December 2007
By Cdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

Simulation and training, technology transfer and unconventional warfare were just a few of the topics discussed by a star-studded series of speakers representing some of the highest ranking officers from NATO countries. These leaders spoke at Allied Command Transformation’s (ACT’s) annual Industry Day 2007 (ID-07), held September 26-27 in Warsaw, Poland. For the fourth consecutive year, AFCEA International’s European office was responsible for administering the two-day event.

Government and the Private Sector Should Coordinate Research Efforts

December 2007
By Kent R. Schneider

In an era in which commercial research and development dominates scientific progress, government research is important—particularly for the military. It is research in critical technologies that allows our national security structure to maintain the edge—to differentiate the United States from potential adversaries. This enables force projection, allows us to work more effectively with our coalition partners, and maximizes our force effectiveness while minimizing loss of life for the United States.

Stratospheric Aircraft Ready to Soar

December 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

A solar-powered, high-altitude robotic aircraft may soon provide warfighters, scientists and first responders with imagery, sensor data and extended communications links. The lightweight, long-endurance airplane is designed to remain on station, many thousands of feet over a region, for weeks or months at a time.

Current Trends in Intelligence Outsourcing Affect Work Force Stability

December 2007
By Vinh Nguyen

The attacks on the United States in 2001 resulted in the intelligence community gaining tremendous power and resources to pursue U.S. adversaries around the world. Immediately after the attacks, the community began to augment its work force through rapid outsourcing, and this change in staffing led to new issues that had not been dealt with before.

Cultural Changes Key to Reducing Barriers to Open Source Software

December 2007
By Cmdr. Danelle Barrett, USN; Boyd Fletcher; and Dave Huff

Misconceptions about open source software have made many U.S. Defense Department sectors reluctant to employ this technology. Although a 2003 department policy allows its use, many still believe that open source software poses an increased security risk to networks and that it is not supported as well as commercial products.

Structure, Heal Thyself

December 2007
By Rita Boland

Developers are laying the scientific groundwork for a totally new concept in materials engineering. If successful, the results could have major implications for commercial and government products through the creation of immortal materials.

Underground Radio Broadcasts New Possibilities

December 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

First responders have historically had great difficulty communicating with each other and with survivors during operations in mines and very large buildings. A radio technology developed by a U.S. government research laboratory allows rescuers to exchange voice or text messages through hundreds of feet of rock, concrete or debris. Commercial products based on the radio system are preparing to enter the market.

Nano-Engineering Institute Focuses on the Future

December 2007
By Henry S. Kenyon

A cutting-edge U.S. government research center has launched a program to educate the next generation of scientists and experts in the field of nanotechnology. The Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, in partnership with several universities and private sector firms, has combined resources and expertise to found an institution that will enable students to participate in and contribute to advanced research projects.

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