July 2008

July 2008

Watching my Cousin Billy in my backyard lying in a hammock as I prepared for my 4th of July barbecue reminded me why protecting Data at the Rest (DAR) is so important. Data at rest is a lot like Billy. Most of the time it just sits around not doing much, but it will move and work if you prod it. But, it isn’t the lack of initiative that bothers me. It’s the potential for the loss of information that keeps me up at night.

July 2008
By Beverly P. Mowery

The need to share and the need to secure are not in competition.

Cultural changes in the U.S. Defense Department are bringing people out of their comfort zones and encouraging them to take advantage of technology opportunities happening around them. The movement toward a service-oriented world is challenging the systems mentality and is leading to a collaboration and information sharing environment that is more agile and responsive.

July 2008
By Lt. Gen. Harry D. Raduege Jr., USAF (Ret.)

July 2008
By Michael A. Robinson

A new president is part of a major acquisition, scores new contracts.

As a young pilot in the U.S. Navy, S. Daniel Johnson liked the thrill of taking off from and landing on aircraft carriers in the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic. And yet he knew in his heart he wanted something more out of life—an exciting career in business.

July 2008
By Kent R. Schneider

AFCEA was created in 1946 to promote an ethical dialogue between the defense community and industry in the wake of World War II. Over the decades, as the world has changed, so has AFCEA.

During the Cold War, our association helped promote a vital interplay among government laboratories, the commercial sector and the warfighter. Many of the fruits of defense technology research flowed from government laboratories to industry, which in turn developed products to help the Free World deter a monolithic adversary. The end of the Cold War also saw the advent of the information age, and the flow of technology reversed, moving from the commercial sector to government.

July 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Joint CONUS Communications Support Environment (JCCSE) is a system designed to support network-centric command, control and communications capabilities to support the National Guard and civilian authorities during a disaster.
Network allows military, civilian first responders to interoperate in emergencies.

July 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

July 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

July 2008
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Lt. Damian Taylor, USN (l), program manager, Iraqi Command and Control Network (IC2N), and Col. Karlton Johnson, USAF, J-6, Multinational Security Transition Command–Iraq (MNSTC-I), plan strategies for possible IC2N fielding priorities to recommend to the Iraqi Minister of Interior.
Cooperative effort enables ministries of Defense and Interior to stay connected and share information.

July 2008
By Rita Boland

 
Josh Williamson analyzes C-5 flight data in support of the growing C-5 workload for the 402nd Software Maintenance Group. A new facility is solidifying Warner Robins Air Logistics Center as the electronic warfare center of excellence for the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Defense Department.
Personnel and programs will be less stovepiped as support for key military programs improves.

July 2008
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The Joint Information Operations Warfare Command (JIOWC) is responsible for coordinating a variety of information-based capabilities throughout the U.S. Defense Department. The JIOWC manages a range of operations such as deception and
psychological, electronic and cyber warfare.
Data sharing, coordination between commands enhances electronic, cyber combat missions.

July 2008
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A car bomb explodes in Iraq. The battle against improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is fought on a shifting technological landscape as terrorists continuously change their ways to try to stay a step ahead of allied countermeasures.
No one-size-fits-all solution will stop terrorist bombers.