SIGNAL Online Exclusives

August 21, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Navy’s afloat network will benefit from cloud computing while enhancing cybersecurity.

August 21, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Defense contractor giant Lockheed Martin’s LUMEN technology aims to protect cellular phone users from rogue, spoofing systems.

August 20, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

For two decades, CERDEC’s Outreach Program has offered a host of courses to get students, from elementary- through college-aged, excited about careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

August 14, 2014
By Cyndy Hogan

The business world is taking a cue from the gaming world, increasingly using a system of incentives and old-fashioned competition to spur engagement. Gamification, which started out on video game screens with top score designations and leaderboards, is now helping companies meet real-life objectives.

August 14, 2014
By Rita Boland

Foreign fighters, general Middle East unrest and how to handle the unfolding events in Ukraine led interests during the Australia-United States Ministerial Consultation 2014 discussion.

August 8, 2014
By George I. Seffers

Navy competition launches technology innovation and student careers.

August 7, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

U.S. Army engineers developed technology prototypes aimed at weaning U.S. forces from dependence on GPS systems.

August 6, 2014
By Rita Boland

A small form factor device that will allow communications from low-level unclassified networks up to high-level secret classified networks has completed the development stage and is in the process of transferring to its new program.

July 31, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

A whirlwind of big companies buying smaller, high-quality companies is setting up 2014 as a huge year for mergers and acquisitions.

July 23, 2014
By George I. Seffers

DARPA director describes a global shift in the technology environment that poses a national threat.

July 18, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The U.S. Navy's pet project for a carrier-launched unmanned aerial vehicle came under fire by experts this week, who told a congressional subcommittee that the sea service’s proposal is redundant, already obsolete and will leave naval forces with a vulnerable platform.

July 17, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The missile system claimed by a Ukrainian Interior Ministry adviser to be responsible for the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over eastern Ukraine is manufactured in Ukraine and is in use by both Ukrainian and Russian military forces. If the missile system is confirmed as the cause of the crash, determining which side fired it could be difficult.

July 17, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

The Defense Department’s Office of the Inspector General launched Thursday a social media and poster campaign to spread the word of whistleblower protections afforded to defense contractors and subcontractors.

July 16, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Marine Corps Warfighting Lab wraps up experiments testing multiple systems, including robots, radios and ship-to-shore transporters in Hawaii.

July 16, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Where human analysis might fail in the intelligence community, technological solutions are at the ready to fill the void. Companies are ginning up software programs that can prove to be key for intelligence analysts as they track the bad guys—be they insider threats or an outside enemy.

July 11, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

When the U.S. Air Force needed a new secure satellite communications system, one company was able to show up at the starting line with an 80 percent solution based on an existing product line serving the Army and the Navy.

July 9, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

A U.S. Army team is modernizing legacy cryptographic equipment at bases around the world to safeguard military information shared on already overhauled tactical networks.

July 3, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

Cyber attacks are high on the Department of Homeland Security’s radar, but increasing reliance on network technology might be making the country more vulnerable to cyberthreats rather than less.

July 2, 2014
By George I. Seffers

The Instant Eye small unmanned aerial system received approval last Thursday from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be used by an energy company, which will conduct research, development and training to see if the system is practical for inspecting infrastructure such as pipelines, power lines and insulators on towers. It is the first unmanned quadrotor to receive FAA certification and may be the lightest aircraft ever certified. The approval opens the door for the system to be used for a wide range of commercial applications.

July 1, 2014
By Sandra Jontz

DARPA is funding a new program to help combat depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and military suicides. It has tools to analyze facial expressions, body gestures and speech, both content and delivery, and inform experts on a user’s psychological state of mind or alert them to behavioral changes that could indicate problems.

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