August 2011

August 25, 2011
By Rachel Eisenhower Lilly

Although women make up nearly 50 percent of the U.S. work force, they fill less than 25 percent of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) positions. The unequal share of women in STEM is particularly apparent in the engineering field, where only one out of every seven engineers is female. This vast gender gap restricts the United States in the global race for a high-tech work force.

August 22, 2011

“It’s all about the network” is the rallying cry for the digital resources that enable the Army to perform its mission more effectively and efficiently. Yet, the Army Network requires a significant amount of effort, not only to develop, implement, maintain and improve it, but also to keep it secure. Those specific network or “Net-Work” tasks are the responsibility of everyone who touches the Army Network.

August 22, 2011

“It’s all about the network” is the rallying cry for the digital resources that enable the Army to perform its mission more effectively and efficiently. Yet, the Army Network requires a significant amount of effort, not only to develop, implement, maintain and improve it, but also to keep it secure. Those specific network or “Net-Work” tasks are the responsibility of everyone who touches the Army Network.

August 22, 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan has recommended that the network architecture approach established in that country be developed for future alliance and coalition operations and exercises.

August 11, 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

Young summer campers whose focus is cybersecurity rather than swimming or working on their tan had a chance to show their skills and maybe earn a scholarship recently in Virginia. It is part of the latest in a series of U.S. Cyber Challenge Camps taking place across the country as part of an effort to get more young people to seriously consider careers in the high-demand field of cybersecurity and information assurance.

August 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

AFCEA headquarters lost power right in the middle of the production cycle of this issue of SIGNAL Connections. Rumor has it that road construction taking place in the area caused the glitch. Without access to computers and VoIP phones, staff members emerged from their work spaces like bears after hibernation and actually talked to each other face to face. The incident brought to light an escalating issue that is often ignored: technology is a tool; it’s not communication.

August 15, 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Connections

Under a memorandum of understanding announced on July 14, the U.S. Coast Guard Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Information Technology (C4IT) Service Center will leverage AFCEA resources for providing market research, identifying technology trends and raising awareness of ongoing initiatives.

August 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Mentoring has been an integral part of Charisse Stokes’ life. As a participant in the Air Force Junior ROTC in high school, Stokes was intrigued and interested in the organization and its structure. An “outstanding adviser and mentor” encouraged her to continue her ROTC involvementadvice that resulted in Stokes becoming a scholarship cadet at Clemson University. She received her commission in the U.S. Air Force in 1998.

August 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Joining AFCEA provides business-building opportunities. Your company’s visibility is elevated through its corporate profile listing in the AFCEA Source Book.

August 3, 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

A large cyberespionage campaign has been ongoing for five or more years, with its targets ranging from private companies to nations. Commercial cybersecurity experts say all the evidence so far points to a “state player” as the source of the attack, and they have located server logs outlining the extent of the attack.

August 2011

According to a recent story in Bloomberg News, the Department of Homeland Security tried a little experiment by dropping CDs and thumb drives in the parking lots of government building and private contractors. Well, one would imagine this would be a great opportunity for our government employees and the specialized contractors that support them to show off their cyber security chops. After all, isn’t it a given that these people would have cyber security and information assurance best practices drilled into them?

August 2, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

A small business innovation research (SBIR) program is allowing U.S. Army researchers to generate on-the-move satellite links that would take advantage of the greater data rates available from military communications satellites. A recent demonstration at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, proved the worth of this approach for transmitting and receiving vital situational awareness data and command and control messages.

August 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency is beginning a major scrub of user requirements as it proceeds with its new commercial satellite services acquisition process. The communications agency is taking a hard look at thousands of customer requirements to determine the validity of some against the necessity of others.

August 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

U.S. Army communicators are focusing on providing key enabling technologies to warfighters who already are exploiting new networking capabilities. The urgencies of warfare, coupled with emerging communications requirements, have mandated that engineers concentrate on the user end of connectivity.

August 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

NATO is reinforcing cybersecurity for its entire communications and information systems architecture and on all of its networks, including unclassified, restricted and secret networks. The project will be implemented in several phases and is speeding toward completion by the end of 2012, a challenging deadline that NATO officials say they are determined to meet.

August 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

NATO is reinforcing cybersecurity for its entire communications and information systems architecture and on all of its networks, including unclassified, restricted and secret networks. The project will be implemented in several phases and is speeding toward completion by the end of 2012, a challenging deadline that NATO officials say they are determined to meet.

August 2011
By Capt. Joseph A. Grace Jr., USN (Ret.), SIGNAL Magazine

Last year, as the April 15 tax deadline approached, I realized that I did not have my W-2 statement from the Navy Reserve. I knew it was no problem because all of that information was “easily” available at MY-PAY online. That was simple—“simple” being a very relative term—when I had a Common Access Card (CAC) and reader. However, as a retired 0-6 without a CAC, there was no “simple” button available to make this process work.

August 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

From the White House, to the Defense Department, and from corporate boardrooms to computer rooms across the country, the issue of protecting the networks of government and industry is increasingly leading to the development of new strategies and plans.

August 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

Whether it is floods in the Midwest United States, earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan, blizzard conditions in Washington, D.C., or hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, one does not have to go far these days to see that natural disasters are becoming a bigger part of life. Nowhere does that reality come into focus more than at the nation’s military bases, where troops face the triple challenge of maintaining a state of readiness prior to disasters, working to serve as recovery resources, and being good neighbors where possible to the local communities they call home.

August 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

It is a project that most officials and power industry leaders acknowledge will take 20 to 30 years. But already, government and industry representatives involved in upgrading the United States’ electrical infrastructure to the highly anticipated smart grid are reporting success in developing some of the first standards for the long-term nationwide project.

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