September 2011

September 15, 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The U.S. Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, Quantico, Virginia, is planning the biggest evaluation yet of its concept for networking unmanned platforms—including sensors, aircraft and ground vehicles—and controlling them with a Common Robotic Controller (CRC).

September 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Education is an AFCEA International core value. For students, teachers and professionals, AFCEA provides opportunities for furthering their education in technical training, leadership development, and science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

September 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

To bring solutions and ideas closer to centers of expertise, AFCEA International will offer three new regional events in 2012.

September 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Lt. Col. Joseph “Jay” Rose, USA (Ret.), says he wouldn’t change anything about his life, but his service in the military and techno-savvy contributions to AFCEA’s Tampa-St. Petersburg Pelican Chapter certainly have changed the lives of many others.

September 15, 2011
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

How can the companies that develop everything from information security solutions to rugged cases capture buyer attention in the same way that app developers have?

September 9, 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The Federal Communications Commission is in the midst of a rulemaking process for Docket No. 11-82, which would extend the commission’s rules under Part 4 of the Communications Act to telecommunications networks based on voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) technology, and broadband networking services provided by Internet service providers (ISPs).

September 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

Military officials in Afghanistan cite the language barrier as one of the most vexing communications obstacles in the battlefield environment. It is a challenge, for example, for U.S. warfighters to communicate effectively with their coalition partners or with the Afghanistan National Security Forces, especially if they are talking over tactical radios during combat chaos. More critical still is the need for warfighters to communicate effectively with Afghan citizens and leaders at all levels.

September 2011
By Paul A. Strassmann, SIGNAL Magazine

One mandate of the Clinger-Cohen Act of 1996 was creation of the Information Technology Architecture. In subsequent 1999 guidance, the Federal Chief Information Officers Council defined the Federal Enterprise Architecture as the process for developing, maintaining and facilitating the implementation of integrated systems.

September 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The U.S. Air Force is clearing the air for advanced networking as it takes its next step into cyberspace exploitation. A unified effort aims to improve battlespace information sharing along with active cyberoperations, both offensive and defensive.

September 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

A research project funded by the U.S. Air Force and taking place among academics in Texas is advancing a new class of metamaterials that could open up a range of applications for defense requirements. By finding new methods for creating synthetic compounds, scientists believe they can develop nanomaterials with properties better suited for products such as electronics than anything found in nature.

September 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Microsoft and Google are two of the most recognized company names in the world. And just as they revolutionized the past, these leaders are striving to invent the future.

September 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Devices and dictionaries for converting basic phrases from one language to another are common tools for travelers in foreign countries. But when understanding context, dialect and personalities offers the chance to stop an attack or catch a terrorist, official personnel need more sophisticated technology.

September 2011
By Kent R. Schneider, SIGNAL Magazine

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is putting the finishing touches on planning and is beginning the transition to the most profound restructuring in its history. Wherever they are based, all who work with NATO will be affected by this restructuring. NATO headquarters staff is being reduced by as much as 40 percent. NATO agencies are being reduced from 13 to three. The force structure is being enhanced, but the command and control elements of the force structure are being streamlined to make NATO more responsive.

September 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

The worst attack on American soil since Pearl Harbor changed everything. Nowhere is that more true than at the federal agency that was stood up almost two years after 9/11 to make sure that such an attack never happens again—the Department of Homeland Security.

September 2011
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

The agency that administers patents among the nations of the European Union is about to receive some high-technology help from across the Internet. And, it will do so without a single euro changing hands.

September 2011
By Capt. Joseph A. Grace Jr., USN (Ret.), SIGNAL Magazine

This is as simple as a tale of two airports.

September 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

As the U.S. human space program transitions to a new era of commercial space exploitation, a legacy space debris detection system is about to give way to a high-technology replacement designed to introduce state-of-the-art situational awareness to orbital mechanics. The new system would be able to detect objects in earth orbit as small as the golf ball that astronaut Alan Shepard smacked during his moonwalk.

September 2011
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

By July 2012, NATO officials expect to have established three new agencies as part of a major reform effort that will reduce the number of agencies from the current 14. NATO now is in the process of implementing agency reform, as well as overhauling its command structure.