April 2012

April 24, 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The situation in Afghanistan is good but not great, and corruption is the biggest problem facing the nation, according to Maj. Gen. John A. Toolan Jr., USMC. The corruption comes in two forms: the parasitic type found in the central government and the predatory corruption found in the military and police forces, especially the Afghan National Police. At the high level, dishonest officials use the current weak state of the Afghan government as a host off which they feed, often also making money from the drug trade.

April 18, 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The report also recommends that Congress return to the president the authority to determine the export control jurisdictional status of satellites and related items.

April 16, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

In addition to white papers and research material, the Resource Library is the repository for archived webinars, so site visitors can view them when and where they’d like.

April 16, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Shop!AFCEA has opened its e-doors, and members can purchase hats, jackets and shirts that include the official AFCEA logo.

August 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

SIGNAL Online now features a section dedicated to sharing white papers and other instructional and research materials.

April 16, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

The Homeland Security Directory includes information about companies that design and develop technologies such as sensors, vulnerability assessments or information security solutions.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

AFCEANs receive deep discounts from Microsoft, Dell and HP as well as are eligible to join the Pentagon Federal Credit Union (PenFed), which offers member benefits of its own plus highly competitive interest rates on mortgages, auto loans and credit cards.

April 16, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Putting aside for a minute some of the overzealous TSA security rules and the literally strange behavior of flight crewmembers recently, there’s a much more common, insanely exasperating type of activity that occurs on airplanes today: thoughtlessness.

April 16, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

When it comes to living life, Col. Vic Budura, USAF (Ret.), certainly is above par, which is good in his personal and professional life, but not so good for his golf--a sport he’s played since age 12.

April 13, 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The U.S. State Department wants to spend as much as $1 billion over the next five years to expand its fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to be used primarily for embassy security and to protect transportation routes.

The agency's formal request for proposal seeks bids for "real-time air surveillance of fixed installations, proposed movement routes, and special events thereby improving security in high-threat or potentially high-threat environments."

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman

The defense budget cuts proposed for the foreseeable future offer the potential for both weakening the military and triggering a renaissance in innovation. And, that is just for the current reductions in the budget; if further draconian cuts are imposed, then no amount of innovation will make up for what some experts describe as a devastating evisceration of U.S. defense capabilities.

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

Now that information systems have redefined how a military leader exercises command and control, they are being retasked to free that leader from constraints imposed in the process of innovation and revolution. The technology revolution has been established; now the cultural struggle is underway.

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is juggling several different directions as it plans for the next five years. But, rather than face having to choose which direction to pursue, the agency has mapped a course in which all of the different paths aim for a common destination.

April 1, 2012
By Paul A. Strassmann, SIGNAL Magazine

Email is the most attractive application for leading to implementation of a Defense Department enterprise-wide strategy. Email features are generic and functionally identical. It is shared across all components. It is mature. A shared directory of addresses and the security requirements are identical and do not require innovation. Implementing email as a software-as-a-service (SaaS) by an organization such as the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) would offer immediate cost reductions of at least 50 percent. This would serve as a precedent for similar enterprise-wide efforts that could follow.

April 1, 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

U.S. MARINES fighting the war in Afghanistan have embraced solar power as a way to become more self-sufficient and less dependent on batteries and generators at the front lines. The use of solar energy and renewable energy sources is part of a plan by the Corps to cut by half its reliance on non-renewable energy sources by 2025.

April 2012
By Lt. Daniel T. Murphy, USN, SIGNAL Magazine

The next time U.S. forces fight in the littorals—whether it be in the Persian Gulf, Africa, Asia or elsewhere—adversaries, if they are smart, will adopt the land tactics that have made insurgents effective in Iraq and Afghanistan. And, if the U.S. military is smart, it will bring to the asymmetric maritime fight the same force-multiplying intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance tools that have kept casualty rates surprisingly low in the ground fight in Iraq and Afghanistan.

April 2012
By Kent R. Schneider, SIGNAL Magazine

I joined the U.S. Army in 1968. Having been trained as a Signal officer, I went to the field in the early 1970s with maps in hand, and I used acetate and grease pencils to prepare overlays for troop movements, command post and signal site locations, and the ever-important radio line-of-sight calculations. One of the greatest technology developments of the time was the marking pen—we got rid of grease pencils and we had color!

April 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

The entire U.S. Defense Department has put a strong emphasis in recent years on the need to develop alternative energy technologies not only to reduce dependence on foreign oil, but also to ensure its own energy security. Airmen have responsibility for more than 100 of these projects, and even personnel typically associated with the most dangerous missions have embarked on research. Special operations troops are determined to remain on the cutting edge as their headquarters base leads the way in confirming the viability of some new offerings.

April 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

In the battle to share information effectively among local, state and federal partners, the National Guard Bureau has employed a tool designed to give personnel an edge. This geospatial information technology is deployed across the United States and its territories, enabling better coordination during emergency situations. With Google Earth as its base, it already has proved valuable in large-scale responses, and officials are planning future improvements.

April 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

Handheld mobile devices will be the next delivery vehicles for geospatial intelligence if the agency responsible for processing and delivering the vital information has its way. The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency already has developed apps for a variety of different mobile platforms, and it is working with the commercial sector to expand the menu it is about to offer to individual users in the field.

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