May 2012

May 30, 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

May 24, 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The U.S. Army is making good on the mantra "train as you fight" by connecting units in garrison with the same mission command systems they use during deployments. Breaking through the bureaucracy inherent in putting these tactical technologies on a strategic network means that soldiers will be better prepared for their work in theater.

May 11, 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The cyberthreat to the natural gas infrastructure is just a brushstroke in a bigger picture of an ongoing and evolving cybersecurity threat to the government and the nation, according to Greg Wilshusen, director of information security issues with the Government Accountability Office.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

Few people have the nerve to take on huge tasks and the stamina to see them through, but Master Sgt. Paul Kammerman, USAF, certainly is one of them.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

One expert believes that responding to requests for information (RFIs) is actually one of the best ways companies can influence government acquisition.

May 15, 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Connections

AFCEA International and the Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP) are sponsoring a national intelligence writing contest that offers a top prize of $3,000 and a three-year membership in both organizations.

May 3, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Online Exclusive

The U.S. Defense Department's Joint Information Enterprise (JIE), launched by the Joint Chiefs of Staff Operational Deputies, will be built on "five big rocks," according to the assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Vice Adm. Harry B. Harris Jr., USN, told the audience at the AFCEA NOVA Naval IT Day on May 3 that big rocks must serve as the foundation so that little rocks can be implemented atop them.

May 2012
By Kent R. Schneider, SIGNAL Magazine

The command, control, communications and computers (C4) technology community has undergone a great deal of change over the past couple of years. The U.S. Cyber Command and the military services’ cyber component commands were created, the Joint Forces Command was disbanded, the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration (ASD NII) transformed to become the Office of the Defense Chief Information Officer (CIO), the J-6 (C4) on the Joint Staff was eliminated, and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has changed significantly. All of these modifications have resulted in adjustments to priorities, shifts of mission and more focus on the enterprise.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The future of coalition operations may be unfolding within a NATO command in Afghanistan. The Eurocorps, a multinational corps that is barely two decades old, is focusing on building a capability that will allow a coalition force to respond rapidly to urgent operational needs.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The European Union is trying to bring the defense programs of its 27 member nations into synchronicity before the budget boom is lowered on military spending.

May 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

The Defense Information Systems Agency is striving to wrap its digital arms around the growing plethora of military data by consolidating standards and requirements.

May 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

When U.S. Marines of the future come under enemy fire, they may be able to use a tablet or smartphone to call for ammunition, other supplies, or for air casualty evacuation by an autonomous helicopter smart enough to avoid hostile forces and safely land itself.

May 2012
By Paul A. Strassmann, SIGNAL Magazine

Any aggregation of computers, software and networks can be viewed as a “cloud.” The U.S. Defense Department is actually a cloud consisting of thousands of networks, tens of thousands of servers and millions of access points. The department’s fiscal year 2012 spending for information technologies is $38.4 billion. This includes the costs of civilian and military payroll as well as most information technology spending on intelligence. The total Defense Department cloud could be more than $50 billion, which is 10 times larger than the budget of the 10 largest commercial firms. So, the question is: How efficient is the Defense Department in making good use of its information technology?

May 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

Solar energy could help reduce the $4 billion annual electricity bill at U.S. military bases worldwide, with an output of power equivalent to seven nuclear plants possible using the land at just four bases.

May 2012
By Max Cacas, SIGNAL Magazine

After a decade of fighting throughout deserts and mountains, the U.S. Marine Corps is in the midst of a multiyear effort to re-establish itself as the nation's primary amphibious military force.

May 2012
By Maryann Lawlor, SIGNAL Magazine

U.S. government departments may be facing deep budget cuts, but companies could end up on top if they listen closely to agencies' priorities. At the top of the list are cloud computing, cybersecurity, mobility and information sharing between government and industry.

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

The Defense Information Systems Agency is helping to ensure that military branches can field technology more quickly and less expensively as it simultaneously initiates its own rapid-deployment programs.

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

Marking a sharp departure from recent conflicts, the future of U.S. military action likely includes enemies equipped to deny forces the ability to enter and carry out missions within areas of operations.

May 2012
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

The electronics firms that are leading the information revolution now are facing the challenge of ensuring that their products have no taint of war.

May 2012
By George I. Seffers, SIGNAL Magazine

The Defense Information Systems Agency is at the heart of some of the U.S. Defense Department's most sweeping technological changes.