Cyber

October 1, 2013
By Dr. Ernest McDuffie

This is an important question for a number of reasons. Popular media often talk about the growing shortage of skilled cybersecurity workers needed to fill critical open positions both in government and the private sector. This is true, but employers need specific details on the work force so they can make informed decisions about whom to hire and potential employees need to know what to study to position themselves to be hired.

October 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
Recent insider leaks have added fuel to the fire for cloud computing critics, but National Security Agency officials remain committed to their approach for delivering an enterprise-wide architecture to the entire intelligence community.

Recent insider security breaches have put increased scrutiny on the U.S. intelligence community’s cloud computing plans. But cloud computing initiatives remain unchanged as the technology is expected to enhance cybersecurity and provide analysts with easier ways to do their jobs in less time.

October 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
The U.S. National Security Agency’s (NSA’s) National Security Operations Center (NSOC) serves as the heart of the NSA’s signals intelligence reporting. The part of signals intelligence that covers social media may spin off into its own discipline as intelligence experts refocus their means of collection and analysis of the unique data it can provide.

The Arab Spring, which rose from street-level dissent to form a mass movement, might not have come as a surprise to intelligence agencies if only they had been able to read the tea leaves of social media. The characteristics of social media that differentiate it from other messaging media are compelling intelligence officials to change the way they derive valuable information from it. As a result, experts are calling for the creation of a new discipline that represents a separate branch of intelligence activity.

September 18, 2013

Eight emerging cybersecurity technologies ready for transition into commercial products will be unveiled at the Mayflower Renaissance Hotel on October 9. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate is hosting the event, which will feature intrusion detection, removable media protection, software assurance and malware forensics capabilities.

September 16, 2013
By Maryann Lawlor

AFCEA International’s Corporate Member Only Forum will focus on current and future cybersecurity staff needs. A panel of experts will discuss what it takes to ensure network security through knowledge. Dr. Earnest McDuffie lead for the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education, National Institute of Standards and Technology, will moderate the discussion.

September 9, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

As the intelligence community moves into the cloud, it launches the first step at the desktop level.

September 6, 2013
George I. Seffers

Officials at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, are developing a program that allows students from any academic discipline to work closely with the U.S. intelligence community in a variety of actual national security-related problems. The university is on track to begin offering a minor in intelligence analysis in the relatively near future and a major in the next five years.

September 1, 2013
By Kent R. Schneider

Do you ever find yourself trying to reconcile with your environment? That is where I am now with regard to national security and reaction to leaks and programs designed to protect against terrorist threats.

In 2010, Julian Assange and his WikiLeaks organization got themselves on the world stage by publishing large volumes of classified documents, many provided by Pfc. Bradley Manning, USA, an intelligence analyst. At that time, and since, both Assange and Manning have been held up as villains by some and as heroes and whistle-blowers by others.

September 1, 2013
By Lt. Col. Carl Allard Young, USA

A great deal of discussion revolves around cyberspace, cyberwarfare, cybercrime, cyberdefense and cybersecurity, but what about cyberlaw, a critical component of societies’ abilities to address the other components successfully? “Cyber” is a global, multitrillion- dollar industry with annual cybercrime cost estimates ranging from $250 billion to $1 trillion. Determining how to define cybertransgressions; properly and accurately identify friendly, neutral and adversarial cyber actors; and develop the laws and international conventions to handle them are serious concerns for the future of civilian and national security and defensive realms. Such determinations have to properly balance corporate, security and defensive, property and privacy interests within frameworks consistent with U.S. legal ideals.

September 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

 

In the next few years, usernames and passwords could gradually fade from popular use as a way to conduct business online. A public/private coalition is working on a new policy and technical framework for identity authentication that could make online transactions less dependent on these increasingly compromised identity management tools. A second round of federal grants from the group, expected this fall, will lead to continued work on what is expected to become a private sector-operated identity management industry.

September 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers
NATO forces destroyed a military compound in Libya during recent operations. Under the new network infrastructure, commanders will be able to expand information technology capabilities virtually rather than bringing in truckloads of new equipment.

 

NATO officials are laying the groundwork for a centralized enterprise networking architecture with invitations to bid expected to be released by year’s end. The new approach is expected to offer a number of benefits, including cost savings, improved network reliability, enhanced cybersecurity and greater flexibility for warfighters.

September 1, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman
Two signal soldiers set up an antenna at a training site in Fort Gordon, Georgia. Keeping signaleers up-to-date is a primary challenge, as the development of new technologies is outpacing the ability to train.

The U.S. Army Signal Corps is expanding the work its personnel conduct while dealing with technology and operational challenges that both help and hinder its efforts. On the surface, Army signal is facing the common dilemma afflicting many other military specialties—it must do more with fewer resources.

September 1, 2013
By Paul A. Strassmann

In his June interview with SIGNAL Magazine, Gen. Keith B. Alexander advocated bringing together the signal community, signals intelligence and the cyber community. In that interview, he said, “We need to think of ourselves not as signals, not as intelligence, not as cyber, but instead as a team that puts us all together.” Yet, that goal raises several questions. How can these concepts be achieved? How can a combination of more than 15,000 system enclaves from the U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force become interoperable? What technologies are needed in the next five years while insufficient budgets make consolidations difficult?

August 30, 2013
By Paul Christman and Jamie Manuel

For years, the Defense department took a “do it alone” posture when it came to sharing information and protecting its networks and communication infrastructures from security attacks. Now in an interconnected world of reduced budgets and ever-increasing security risks, the DOD is fundamentally changing the way it approaches information sharing and cybersecurity. 

August 21, 2013
By Henry Kenyon

As a part of its ongoing efforts to protect critical national infrastructure, the Obama administration has been actively working on making government computer networks more robust and resistant to cyber attack. To do this, the White House has looked internally at federal agencies to put into place new metrics and policies to improve their security stance and externally, reaching out to foreign governments to set up international accords on cyber espionage, a top administration official said.
 

August 20, 2013

 

August 5, 2013
By Max Cacas

When it comes to cloud computing, there are two items that are top of mind for Dave McClure, Associate Administrator with the General Services Administration (GSA) in Washington, D.C.
 

August 1, 2013
By George I. Seffers and Robert K. Ackerman
The Black-I Robotics LandShark unmanned ground vehicle is an open-source platform being used to write assured software. It shares some computer control features with modern automobiles, which are becoming increasingly vulnerable to system takeover by outsiders.

 

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is developing new control software to reduce the vulnerability of unmanned systems to cyber attack. This effort is relying on new methods of software development that would eliminate many of the problems inherent in generating high-assurance software.

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